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Question
Posted by: chichi | 2004/09/25

quick question

Hi everyone

I know it's been ages since my last posting, but I have a quick question. My + hubby showed me the other evening these spots on his back, it's like small dry dark spots with small pimples on it. It is situated on his shoulder blade just behind his armpits more or less. There is also one on his stomach.It's also a bit swollen he says, but not very painfull. He thinks the swelling is caused by the exercise equipment he uses called an abgymnic that he rolls back and forth on the floor, but I told him to go to the doctor to see what's wrong. Is this to be expected, please respond asap anyone who knows anything.

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Our expert says:
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He should consult a doctor

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

3
Our users say:
Posted by: Sello | 2004/09/30

Hi Chichi

Check this outi am not sure whether this could be the pathogen.

Kaposi's sarcoma, or KS, is a type of cancer that men with AIDS may develop. It is rarely seen in women. Although KS mainly affects the skin, the mouth, and the lymph nodes, it can also involve the bowels and lungs. If it becomes severe, it may lead to swelling or breakdown of the skin. KS growths, called lesions or tumors, can show up in a wide range of colors, from pink to red-violet to brown to blue. Recent studies have shown that KS may be caused by a kind of sexually transmitted herpesvirus that has been called KSHV, or HHV 8.

Because KS can appear anywhere on the body, and may look like other skin lesions, a biopsy of the skin is generally required to confirm a diagnosis. A biopsy is when a small piece of tissue is removed for examination and is usually painless. When KS is suspected to involve the lungs, a test called a bronchoscopy is usually performed. KS involving the gastrointestinal tract is best diagnosed by a test called an endoscopy.

Skin lesions are generally flat, painless and do not itch or drain. They can look similar to a bruise, but do not blanche, or turn white, when pressure is applied to them like a bruise does. As the lesions progress, they may become elevated, patch-like, and flow together.

Early on, these growths may be very small and innocent looking, causing no problems except for concern about their appearance. The pace of the disease varies from person to person. In some, tumor growth is slow with little change from month to month. In others, growth is rapid with new spots occurring almost every week.

It's important to bring new spots to the attention of your health care provider. If you have a small number of skin lesions, they do not have to be treated. However, if you prefer having something done about them, they can be treated by having them injected with anti-cancer medicine called vincristine. They can also be treated with x-rays or liquid nitrogen.

If the KS has spread throughout your system, chemotherapy is necessary. Chemotherapies used to treat KS include combinations of anti-cancer drugs called vinblastine, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, and doxorubicin. If your T4 cell count is over 200, you may be treated with alfa interferon. Some people can tolerate alfa interferon, but others have a bad reaction with flu-like symptoms including chills, headaches, and fatigue.

Newer treatments called liposome drugs are approved for the treatment of KS. Liposome drugs are standard chemotherapy drugs used to treat KS that are put inside microscopic bubbles of fat called liposomes. When the drugs are used this way, it is hoped they will have fewer side effects and be more effective. One liposomal drug is called Doxil, and the other is called DaunoXome.

DaunoXome has been approved as a first-line treatment for advanced KS. In a recent study comparing DaunoXome to standard combination chemotherapy, people taking DaunoXome responded better. Doxil is now approved for the treatment of advanced KS in people that have not responded to standard combination chemotherapy. It is also recommended if people can't take standard chemotherapy because of side effects.

Chemotherapy drugs can have many side effects. They can damage your heart, and also affect your bone marrow. Your bone marrow makes white blood cells. When you lose white blood cells, you are more likely to get bacterial infections. There are treatments to help make more white blood cells. If you're getting chemotherapy, your doctor will watch for symptoms that need treatment.

The most recently approved treatment is Taxol. Other experimental drugs are in studies for the treatment of KS, including the anti-herpes drug foscarnet and some creams for lesions that are just on the skin. If you are interested in finding out more about experimental treatments, call The Network.

KS can be treated with radiation, chemotherapy and certain immunomodulators. These treatments often have severe toxic side effects such as suppression of bone marrow activity and white blood cell production. Additional side effects, such as hair loss and nausea, may impact quality of life during treatment. New liposomal therapies seem to have less of these side effects.

Reply to Sello
Posted by: Sello | 2004/09/30

Hi Chichi

Check this outi am not sure whether this could be the pathogen.

Kaposi's sarcoma, or KS, is a type of cancer that men with AIDS may develop. It is rarely seen in women. Although KS mainly affects the skin, the mouth, and the lymph nodes, it can also involve the bowels and lungs. If it becomes severe, it may lead to swelling or breakdown of the skin. KS growths, called lesions or tumors, can show up in a wide range of colors, from pink to red-violet to brown to blue. Recent studies have shown that KS may be caused by a kind of sexually transmitted herpesvirus that has been called KSHV, or HHV 8.

Because KS can appear anywhere on the body, and may look like other skin lesions, a biopsy of the skin is generally required to confirm a diagnosis. A biopsy is when a small piece of tissue is removed for examination and is usually painless. When KS is suspected to involve the lungs, a test called a bronchoscopy is usually performed. KS involving the gastrointestinal tract is best diagnosed by a test called an endoscopy.

Skin lesions are generally flat, painless and do not itch or drain. They can look similar to a bruise, but do not blanche, or turn white, when pressure is applied to them like a bruise does. As the lesions progress, they may become elevated, patch-like, and flow together.

Early on, these growths may be very small and innocent looking, causing no problems except for concern about their appearance. The pace of the disease varies from person to person. In some, tumor growth is slow with little change from month to month. In others, growth is rapid with new spots occurring almost every week.

It's important to bring new spots to the attention of your health care provider. If you have a small number of skin lesions, they do not have to be treated. However, if you prefer having something done about them, they can be treated by having them injected with anti-cancer medicine called vincristine. They can also be treated with x-rays or liquid nitrogen.

If the KS has spread throughout your system, chemotherapy is necessary. Chemotherapies used to treat KS include combinations of anti-cancer drugs called vinblastine, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, and doxorubicin. If your T4 cell count is over 200, you may be treated with alfa interferon. Some people can tolerate alfa interferon, but others have a bad reaction with flu-like symptoms including chills, headaches, and fatigue.

Newer treatments called liposome drugs are approved for the treatment of KS. Liposome drugs are standard chemotherapy drugs used to treat KS that are put inside microscopic bubbles of fat called liposomes. When the drugs are used this way, it is hoped they will have fewer side effects and be more effective. One liposomal drug is called Doxil, and the other is called DaunoXome.

DaunoXome has been approved as a first-line treatment for advanced KS. In a recent study comparing DaunoXome to standard combination chemotherapy, people taking DaunoXome responded better. Doxil is now approved for the treatment of advanced KS in people that have not responded to standard combination chemotherapy. It is also recommended if people can't take standard chemotherapy because of side effects.

Chemotherapy drugs can have many side effects. They can damage your heart, and also affect your bone marrow. Your bone marrow makes white blood cells. When you lose white blood cells, you are more likely to get bacterial infections. There are treatments to help make more white blood cells. If you're getting chemotherapy, your doctor will watch for symptoms that need treatment.

The most recently approved treatment is Taxol. Other experimental drugs are in studies for the treatment of KS, including the anti-herpes drug foscarnet and some creams for lesions that are just on the skin. If you are interested in finding out more about experimental treatments, call The Network.

KS can be treated with radiation, chemotherapy and certain immunomodulators. These treatments often have severe toxic side effects such as suppression of bone marrow activity and white blood cell production. Additional side effects, such as hair loss and nausea, may impact quality of life during treatment. New liposomal therapies seem to have less of these side effects.

Reply to Sello
Posted by: Inc | 2004/09/27

Difficult to say. If it's not painful, then it's not shingles... maybe get it checked out by the doctor... skin disorders are common when one is infected.

Reply to Inc

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