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Question
Posted by: jta | 2005/01/06

Pregnancy & Smoking

Hi I am now around about 6 months and although gave up smoking for around 3 months at the beginning I unfortunately restarted and am now worrying myself dialy about the side effects as am not sure what terrible things I could be causing my unborn child. I am trying to stop again but is proving extremely hard.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageGynaeDoc

Try to at least cut down. Smoking impairs the blood flow from the placenta to the baby and can result in poor growth and lack of oxygen to the baby.

Best wishes

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Our users say:
Posted by: I SMOKED | 2005/01/08

Hi there. I smoked through my whole pregnancy and my baby is fine. They also say that smoking while pregnant kills the babys brain cells. Yes I am sure smoking while pregnant is very bad but nothing happened to my son. He is 2 now and nothing wrong with him. I did cut down alot though. Maybe that is why there is nothing wrong. You don't need to stop altogether, otherwise I am sure your baby with go through with drawl symptoms as well as you. As it has been getting this smoke for a while now.

Reply to I SMOKED
Posted by: Liza | 2005/01/07

My mom smoked during all her pregnancies. She had 2 miscarraiges (one early, one at 6 months). None of my siblings and I weighed more than 2.5 kg at birth - even though we were full term. My brother was premature - and weighed 1.2 kg at birth. My birth weight was 2.2 kg. My youngest sister was the luckiest - cause my mom tried very hard to smoke less during her pregnancy. She weighed 2.5 kg at birth - the lowest weight that they consider a 'normal' weight for a full-term baby. At 18 months I developed double pneumonia - not quite sure whether that was a result of my mom's smoking. Even when I go for a lung function test today, my results show that I have asthma - even though I don't.

Please try very hard to stop smoking, it could harm your unborn child in ways you cannot even imagine.

Reply to Liza
Posted by: Purple | 2005/01/07

Smoking cuts down on the amount of oxygen your baby gets, so can cause a low birth weight with all the problems associated with low birth weight.

If you can't stop completely (which is best), then cut down as much as possible, preferably not more than 5 cigarettes a day.

You can stop completely, many mothers do, and I am one of them - it just takes will power. You will feel so much better for having stopped - both psychologically when you think of the health of your baby, and physically - cigarette smoking makes you feel tired. You don't need to feel more tired while pregnant.

Also, when your baby is born, even if you don't smoke around it, your clothes will be smoky, you'll hold your baby against you and baby will breathe in the smoke on your clothes which increases the risk of cot death dramatically.

It is inadvisable to breast feed if you smoke, as the nicotine passes through the breast milk unaltered, so you are essentially feeding your baby nicotine.

Sorry to sound so heavy handed (reformed smokers are that way ;-), but you are giving your baby the worst possible start in life by continuing to smoke.

Reply to Purple
Posted by: Purple | 2005/01/07

Smoking cuts down on the amount of oxygen your baby gets, so can cause a low birth weight with all the problems associated with low birth weight.

If you can't stop completely (which is best), then cut down as much as possible, preferably not more than 5 cigarettes a day.

You can stop completely, many mother do, and I am one of them - it just takes will power. You will feel so much better for having stopped - both psychologically when you think of the health of your baby, and physically - cigarette smoking makes you feel tired. You don't need to feel more tired while pregnant.

Also, when your baby is born, even if you don't smoke around it, your clothes will be smoky, you'll hold your baby against you and baby will breathe in the smoke on your clothes which increases the risk of cot death dramatically.

It is inadvisable to breast feed if you smoke, as the nicotine passes through the breast milk unaltered, so you are essentially feeding your baby nicotine.

Sorry to sound so heavy handed (reformed smokers are that way ;-), but you are giving your baby the worst possible start in life by continuing to smoke.

Reply to Purple

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