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Question
Posted by: Karen | 2007/12/03

Endocardditis and antibiotics

Went to my GP on Friday and asked for antibiotics. Going for 2 fillings at Dentist tomorrow - and she said that the latest (2007) American heart foundation info says you don't need antibiotics for dental procedures if you have MVP with mild regurg.

am I save to go to the dentist tomorrow? what is the signs of Endocardditis?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberDoc

Hallo Karen
It depends on whether the dentist is going to work on the gums as well: see http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=11086
signs of endocarditis:
Chills and fever.
Fatigue.
Weight loss.
Night sweats.
Painful joints.
Persistent cough and shortness of breath.
Bleeding under the fingernails.
Tiny purple and red spots under the skin, called petechiae.
Dr Bets

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: Ruby | 2007/12/03

Hello, I am not a doctor, so wait for the doctor's reply :-) I also have MVP and were also not sure about the use of antibiotics. I had 2 surgeries in the last 6 months (both shoulders). For my left shoulder they did not give me antibiotics. For my right shoulder, the aneasthetist decided to give me Augmentum via IV. I saw my cardiologist last week and asked him about antibiotics (since the aneasthetist also told me that I must have antibiotics before any surgery or dental procedure). My cardiologists said that it is not necessary. Also read on the American Heart Foundation website, seems like they are actually not even sure if antibiotics should be used in this preventative way at all (even for people with highest risk), since there is not that much proof that it actually prevent endocarditis. Best would probably be to ask your cardiologist, cause he knows how bad your regurg is... Good luck with the dentist!! Regards.

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