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16 April 2012

ELIM and its efficiency

DietDoc investigates whether the the Energy Level Indicator Monitor (ELIM)isa reliable technique.

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While I was able to obtain quite extensive information about the current status of the EndoBarrier, feedback on the Energy Level Indicator Monitor (ELIM), was rather limited (Health Seekers, 2012).

While many electrical instruments are nowadays used regularly to determine body composition (lean vs fat tissue), I have not yet read any scientific publications on the ELIM and its efficiency. It is plausible that someone with low energy levels may have problems with thyroid metabolism or that hyperactive individuals would have much higher energy levels than most other persons. However it is difficult to believe that measuring energy levels will give anyone a true insight into a patient’s background which may or may not have caused his or her obesity. 

Until more scientific studies have tested the ELIM as a diagnostic tool and have provided evidence that it works, I cannot recommend its use.

(Dr IV van Heerden, DietDoc, April 2012)          

References:

Ashton D (2011). News. Dr Ashton - Sept 2011- “No” to EndoBarrier. ; Gangemi S (2011). Easy on the carbs - Get lean, Get Fast. 29 March 2011. Health Seekers (2012). ELIM- Energy level Indicator Monitor. ;Schouten R et al (2010). A multicenter, randomised efficacy study of the EndoBarrier Gastrointestinal Liner for presurgical weight loss prior to bariatric surgery. Ann Surg, 251(2):236-43;

 
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