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15 August 2011

Treating hepatitis with diet

This article concerns the dietary treatment of the acute hepatitis phase which occurs in hepatitis A, B, C, D and E, as well as what can be done for chronic hepatitis conditions.

This article concerns the dietary treatment of the acute hepatitis phase which occurs in hepatitis A, B, C, D and E, as well as what can be done for chronic hepatitis conditions.

1) Appetite stimulation
Appetite stimulation to overcome anorexia - this is probably one of the most difficult challenges facing anyone who is trying to assist a hepatitis patient who may feel so ill and debilitated that they flatly refuse to eat.

  • Full-cream milk, yoghurt, cream, cream cheese and fatty cheeses
  • Biscuits, cakes, pies, tarts, etc with a high-fat content
  • Chocolate
  • Not more than three eggs a week
  • Fatty salad dressings, mayonnaise, sour cream
  • Avocado
  • Fatty, fried meats, fatty fish, poultry skin, all processed meats and sausages, bacon, fatty gravies, fish canned in oil (buy tuna or pilchards canned in water or tomato sauce)
  • Nuts, peanut butter, nut spreads
  • Potato chips, vegetables smothered in butter or white/cheese sauces
  • Fatty snacks or very spicy snacks
  • All food preparation that increases the amount of fat contained in meals, such as frying in butter, margarine or oil. Rather boil, poach, grill, cook in a nonstick pan with Spray and Cook, and cook stews and soups the day before, chill and skim off all the coagulated fat before serving.

 
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