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15 August 2011

The different types of hepatitis and diet

Hepatitis, especially Hepatitis B, C and D, can all have serious consequences. But what are these different types, and what sort of long-term consequences can they have?

Hepatitis, especially Hepatitis B, C and D, can all have serious consequences. Many people wonder whether there are dietary treatments for these conditions.

Different types of hepatitis caused by different viruses can occur, namely:

  • Hepatitis A, which is caused by the hepatitis A virus, is transmitted by the faecal-oral route and recovery is usually complete with few long-term consequences.
  • Hepatitis B, caused by the hepatitis B-virus, is transmitted by contact with blood and body fluids and can lead to chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the liver.
  • Hepatitis C, which is caused by the hepatitis-C virus, is transmitted into the blood from contaminated needles (drug users) and blood products (e.g. blood transfusions or inadvertent contact with infected blood), sexual contact and saliva, and can often develop into chronic hepatis and cirrhosis of the liver.
  • Hepatitis D, which is caused by the hepatitis D virus, is transmitted from intravenous or sexual sources and usually becomes chronic.
  • Hepatitis E, which is caused by the hepatitis E virus, is transmitted by the faecal-oral route and is usually acute with less risk of permanent damage.

  • Early phase - occurs in about 25% of patients and is characterised by a raised temperature, pains in the joints, arthritis, skin rash and swelling of the face, lips, eyelids, etc (angio-oedema).
  • Pre-jaundice phase - patients feel ill and tired, have muscle pains, lose their appetite, vomit, develop nausea and experience taste changes
  • Jaundice phase - full-blown jaundice develops
  • Convalescent phase - most of the symptoms start to improve and the patient usually recovers if he/she is suffering from acute hepatitis A

 
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