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17 January 2011

Dumped food scandal

In a country where millions go hungry and people will eat any food they can find, even if it could be dangerous, how ethical (and safe) is it to throw away old food, asks DietDoc.

In a country where millions go hungry and people will eat any food they can find, even if it could be dangerous, how ethical (and safe) is it to throw away old food, asks DietDoc.

Hard on the heels of the Chicken Scandal, comes the Dumped Food Scandal which hit the headlines last week.

Further investigation found that these spoiled and expired foods and beverages had allegedly originated from a place called the Simply Value Factory Food Shop. The manager of this shop, Santa Kotze told authorities that H Hearn Refuse Removal had been tasked with disposing the expired food items at a proper dump site in Stellenbosch. H Hearn the manager of the refuse removal company allegedly responsible for removing the food items, stated that a casual labourer from Pholile Park persuaded the driver of the truck to take the food to his home in the informal settlement as he intended opening a spaza shop. Mr Hearn also said that he had removed 14 refuse bags filled with the expired food products when contacted by the police after the inhabitants became ill (Hartley, 2011).

 
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