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17 December 2010

Study shows caffeine negatively affects children

Researchers found that 75% of children surveyed consumed caffeine on a daily basis, and the more caffeine the children consumed, the less they slept.

Caffeine consumption in children is often blamed for sleep problems and bedwetting. Information on childhood caffeine consumption is limited, and many parents may not know the amount or effects of their child's caffeine consumption. In a study published in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that 75% of children surveyed consumed caffeine on a daily basis, and the more caffeine the children consumed, the less they slept.

Dr Willian Warzak from the University of Nebraska surveyed the parents of over 200 children between five and 12 years old during routine clinical visits at an urbal paediatric unit. Parents were asked to report the types and amounts of snacks and beverages their child consumed on a daily basis.

Researchers found, however, that caffeine was not linked to bedwetting in these children. "Contrary to popular belief," Dr Evans, coauthor and statistician, clarifies, "children were not more likely to wet the bed if they consumed caffeine, despite the fact that caffeine is a diuretic."

 
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