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22 June 2011

Low birth weight linked to obesity later in life

Altering the levels of two common hormones, insulin and leptin, in utero changes the cellular development in the region of the brain that regulates appetite.

A study that increases the understanding of the link between foetal development and obesity later in life found that altering the levels of two common hormones, insulin and leptin, in utero, changes the cellular development in the region of the brain that regulates appetite. The study was done by researchers at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Centre (LA BioMed), US.

With more than 60% of American adults overweight and more than one in five obese, researchers are closely examining the causes. Obesity is a serious health concern for children and adolescents as well. About 17% of children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 years are obese. In the past, type 2 diabetes occurred mostly in middle-aged people. Today, this type of diabetes is seen in 11% of children and adolescents.

 
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