advertisement
07 November 2011

Fast-food outlets nearby not a weight threat

Most people who live near fast-food restaurants aren't at increased risk for weight gain, but women may put on a few extra kilos, according to a new study.

Most people who live near fast-food restaurants aren't at increased risk for weight gain, but women may put on a few extra kilos, according to a new study.

The findings challenge the widely held belief that living near fast-food restaurants and other unhealthy food outlets has contributed to the rapid rise in Americans' weight over the past few decades.

Researchers analysed 30 years of data collected from participants in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort, which followed heart health and weight among people in and around Framingham, Mass., from 1971 to 2001.

No consistent relationship existed between access to fast-food restaurants and individual body mass index (BMI), a measurement of body fat determined by height and weight.

It's what you eat

"We found that living near a fast-food restaurant had no effect on weight overall, with a minimal effect for women," study author Dr Jason Block, who conducted the research as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at Harvard University, said in a foundation news release.

"Our study shows that it's likely not where you live that matters, but what you eat," he added.

Block and colleagues found that predictors of higher BMI in both women and men included not smoking, older age, being married and consuming two or more alcoholic drinks per day. Among women, having a high school education or less was also associated with higher BMI.

 "As we grapple with our obesity epidemic, this study shows that living next to a fast-food restaurant may not be a significant driver of weight gain over time," Block said. "There are clearly other factors that affect BMI more."

The study will be published in the issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

 (HealthDay, November 2011)

(Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X

5 reasons to love avocados

2018-10-14 07:00
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Teen angst »

Detecting depression: Phone apps could monitor teen angst

Studies have linked heavy smartphone use with worsening teen mental health. But as teens scroll through Instagram and Snapchat, tap out texts or watch YouTube videos, they also leave digital footprints that might offer clues to their psychological well-being.

Lifestyle changes »

Lifestyle changes helped new dad shed more than 20kg

Erik Minaya started to put on the kilos during his first year year in college. By age 24, he tipped the scale at nearly 120kg. But then he cut out fast food, replacing it with lower-carb offerings that he prepared himself.