advertisement
06 September 2007

Food additives up hyperactivity

A British study has found that additives in drinks, sweets and cakes can contribute to hyperactivity in children.

0
A British study has found that additives in drinks, sweets and cakes can contribute to hyperactivity in children.

The study of 300 random children by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) published Thursday found that they behaved impulsively and lost concentration after a drink containing additives, used mostly for colouring and preservation.

In Brussels, the European Commission said it had asked the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to evaluate the British study.

Waiting for further findings
Once the result of the assessment was known, the Commission would decide on whether "further measures are necessary for the additives in question."

EFSA was currently re-evaluating all authorized additives "to ensure that their safety assessment is still valid in light of the latest scientific data and technological developments."

However, the British researchers pointed out that there were many factors associated with hyperactivity including genes, being born prematurely, environment and upbringing.

Read more:
Allergic to food additives?
What are food additives?

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Mental health & your work »

How open are you about mental illness in the workplace?

Mental health in the workplace – what you can do to help

If you know that one of your colleagues suffers from a mental illness, would you be able to help them at work? Maligay Govender offers some helpful mental health "first aid" tips.

Sleep & You »

Sleep vs. no sleep Diagnosis of insomnia

6 things that are sabotaging your sleep

Kick these shut-eye killers to the kerb and make your whole life better – overnight.