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Updated 31 March 2014

Fluproof yourself

The best way to keep your home flu-free is, arguably, to get vaccinated before it’s too late. If that isn’t up your street, though, there are a host of ways to ward off the lurgy.

Flu is the worst. It makes you feel like you’ve been hit by a cold, clammy train, puts you out of work and basically just leaves you utterly useless.

Even worse is that flu spreads faster than you can say “Hey, are you sniffling?” to that creepy guy who keeps leaning on your desk.

Entire offices have been ravaged by the dreaded flu, and this time of year is peak infection season.

BE PREPARED

As always, prevention is better than cure. The best way to keep your home flu-free is, arguably, to get vaccinated before it’s too late. If that isn’t up your street, though, don’t worry. There are a host of ways to ward off the lurgy.

Stay warm
Keeping wrapped up ensures your body isn’t wasting precious infection-fighting energy to keep warm. Who knew that a scarf really could save your life.

Vitamins, see
It’s nothing new, but it’s well known for a reason. Vitamin C hates flu even more than you do. Smash through your RDA and keep your immunity topped up.

Be aware
Too many people, upon feeling ill. Decide that it’s just a cold, or they can sweat it out with a brisk jog. Wrong, son. Catching flu early on can severely cut down the time before your back in action and limit the chance of it spreading to your loved ones. Feeling feverish? Head home, get in bed and pop a Corenza-C.

Swine flu is coming - time to get your shot!
 

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