advertisement
10 January 2011

The DIY get-a-grip guide

In the Health24 offices, we're rather glad it's Brain Awareness Week. There seems to be a worm of rage infecting the brains of some of our countrymen, and it's scary.

In the Health24 offices, we're rather glad it's Brain Awareness Week. There seems to be a worm of rage infecting the brains of some of our countrymen, and it's scary.

Most people in this country are sane, mild-mannered and tolerant. So when taxi drivers act like a pack of wild dogs around a young woman in a short skirt and are defiant when told off; and students (allegedly the country's elite) treat cleaning women with sickening disrespect and then say we're overreacting, we're all the more shocked. Where is empathy? Where is basic decency? Where is judgment?

Health24 writer Amy Henderson asked forensic criminologist Irma Labuschagne what's happening in the psyches of those involved in these and other incidents, and she had some interesting thoughts: we are, she asserts, a very angry nation, and until we get a grip on that as individuals, we should anticipate random acts of senseless destruction.

So, just in case anger has its acid hold on you, or those you're close to, here's the DIY get-a-grip plan from Health24:

There's one more thing I'd urge: so many of us are disconnected from our communities, and that hardens hearts, and entrenches divides. Whether it's a school or church charity or volunteer work in nature, animal rescue or orphanage visits, do something (giving money doesn't count). It's good for your heart (and it's also good for your brain).

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X

More by Cybershrink

2013-02-09 07:27

More:

Columnists
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Lifestyle »

E-cigarettes: Here are five things to know

E-cigarettes have become hugely popular in the past decade, but a rash of vaping-linked deaths and illnesses in the US is feeding caution about a product that's already banned in some places.

Allergy »

Ditch the itch: Researchers find new drug to fight hives

A new drug works by targeting an immune system antibody called immunoglobulin E, which is responsible for the allergic reaction that causes hives.

advertisement