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10 February 2011

Pharaoh Julius

Susan Erasmus is very amused at statements that the ANC Youth Festival helped to foment rebellion in Egypt. It's time for such a reality check .

Susan Erasmus is very amused at statements that the ANC Youth Festival helped to foment rebellion in Egypt. It's time for such a reality check .

Firstly I would like to take this opportunity to thank Julius Malema and the ANCYL. They are a complete gift to any columnist, and they have never once let me down. Way to go, guys.

The statements of Andile Lungisa, ANCYL vice-chairperson, had me rolling in the aisles. It was reported as follows on News 24:

Lungisa said that Egyptian youth who had attended the festival in Pretoria in December, had recently been "at the forefront of the Egyptian revolt".

"I'm not saying we started the protests, but before the festival there were no protests in Egypt.

"After the festival, there were. Draw your own conclusions," Lungisa told the media.

He believes the festival "changed the world's perspective".

He also claimed the festival played a role in the recent protests in Tunisia and the fighting for the separation of South Sudan.


Let's take these statements one by one. Firstly, no one has exact numbers of how many Egyptians attended the Youth Festival in Pretoria, but even if there were quite a few, fomenting a rebellion is no mean feat. Not in a country which has a history going back 3500 years. Wow, those must have been some youth leaders. And some festival. It did cost R100m, after all.

It also makes me wonder whether the French fugitive couple of Sutherland might have put in a guest appearance at said festival. Something has to get the blame for what happened on that desolate farm in January. I mean, everything was quiet for 12 years before then. The difference? The Youth Festival, of course.

 
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