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07 February 2011

Passion gap blues

Susan Erasmus doesn't think Checkers in Bloubergstrand has the right to tell their workers to get rid of their passion gaps.

Susan Erasmus doesn't think Checkers in Bloubergstrand has the right to tell their workers to get rid of their passion gaps.

But that is just what they did, in October last year. A notice was apparently put up telling people "to come to work with a full set of teeth, or show proof that they are planning to get false teeth if they are missing some."

Read the full article here.

Note to Checkers: this branch is in Cape Town. Here are more passion gaps than dust in a southeaster. I think it's time you made peace with it.

Let me spend a few minutes being reasonable, before I go off on a frothy. I do not think passion gaps are particularly attractive, and would not rush to the dentist to get one. I also think in our society they limit one's social mobility and work opportunities.

But hey, whatever happened to personal choice?

In Cape Town a passion gap is part of a rite of passage in certain social groups. No one can really give you a good reason for it, and the origins are lost in the mists of time. I suspect passion doesn't really come into it. (Missing teeth are, if anything, a serious kissing hazard, second only to metal braces. As this is a family website I shall not embroider on any further hazards).

False teeth are also enormously expensive, especially if you earn a labourer's wages, and nowhere did I see an offer from Checkers to foot the bill, so to speak.

 
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