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24 June 2008

The orgasm jab

The ‘G-shot’ isn’t worth a… well, it’s not what it’s cracked up to be, says a SA expert. But that isn’t going to stop us following the story…

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In this weekend’s newspapers, South Africans read about Caroline Cushworth, a British woman who had – and was happy to talk about – the so-called G-shot.

She claims she now has an orgasm every time she has sex (which wasn’t the case before), and that they are much more intense than they used to be.

The ‘orgasm jab’ is a process by which collagen is injected into the G-spot, boosting both its sensitivity and that of the area surrounding it. It also raises and enlarges the elusive G-spot, which reportedly makes it easier to find.

Could this be the solution for every woman whose sex life is less than satisfying?

But before we get to that, some necessary background. What is the G-spot, and why all the fuss?

More about the G-spot
The G-spot – named after one Dr Grafenberg, who originally identified it – is one of those things that abound with myth and misinformation, with women as confused about it as men are, says Jonti Searll, a South African teacher of sexuality and sensuality.

It’s a gland that is roughly triangular in shape, starts just behind the pubic bone and goes deep inside, to just in front of the cervix. So the ‘spot’ is actually long and narrows to a point as it goes deeper.

Research tells us that the G-spot has over 140 ducts. It secretes fluid concerned with three things: fertility, hormone balance and the fluid that some women ejaculate when they orgasm.

Where was it hiding before Dr Grafenberg, asks Searll? Why has traditional medicine and sexology paid so little attention to this source of pleasure, also known as the Goddess Spot?

Back to the female orgasm. Having no or few orgasms is a regular complaint of women on Health24's Sex Forum.

I don’t think so, says Searll
Searll has his doubts about the usefulness or effectiveness of the orgasm jab. His first objection concerns the very powerful emotional aspects of sexuality, “the importance of which cannot be emphasised enough”, he told Health24.

"The G-spot and its surrounding tissue is a definite repository for emotional blockages that are the result of guilt, shame and embarrassment about the body, genitals and sex. It also holds old sexual beliefs, negative and limiting patterns as well as bad sexual experiences from the past.

"Injecting collagen into this is not going to release these issues. It may become more frustrating when you’re expecting some kind of miracle, and it’s not happening.

"It’s going to work for some women, but not for everyone,” he says.

He also points out that though it has been available in the US for a few years, it’s early days for the jab: there may be anecdotal evidence, but no definite figures are given, and success rates are based on speculation.

His second objection, says Searll, concerns the long-term effectiveness of this procedure. “The effects may be short-lived, the impact may wane over those few months, and then what? Is another injection required, and will it be as successful as the first?

“My opinion,” he said, “is that if you change something at a deeper level, looking at the mind and the body and the connection between them, the change will be lasting, not temporary.

“Then there’s the educational aspect. With proper learning and guidance, which doesn’t have to be complicated or involved, finding and stimulating the G-spot can be reasonably easy.”

But what do you think?
The last word should perhaps go to 41-year-old Cushworth. Though she claimed that she and a lover had once, after considerable time, found her G-spot, it remained “incredibly elusive”. And now? “I have quite literally never experienced anything quite like it,' she told the newspapers. “I had constant multiple orgasms which went on for hours.

“That first time, the whole thing was so intense I was actually a bit scared. I was so overcome, but thankfully the intensity is something I've got used to. I still have multiple orgasms every time I have sex, but they no longer leave me flat on my back.”

Phew.

(Susan Erasmus, Health24, June 2008)

 
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