13 July 2011

More older women getting STIs

The sexually transmitted illness (STI) trichomoniasis may be much more common among older women and researchers are recommending routine screening for sexually active women aged 40 and older.


The sexually transmitted illness trichomoniasis may be much more common among older women than those in their 20s, and researchers are recommending routine screening for sexually active women aged 40 and older.

"We usually think of STIs as more prevalent in young people, but our study results clearly show that with [trichomoniasis], while too many young people have it, even more, older women are infected," said the study's senior study investigator, Charlotte Gaydos, professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Trichomoniasis (commonly known as "trich") is caused by the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. It is the most common sexually transmitted illness in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The World Health Organisation estimates that 173 million people worldwide become infected every year.

The infection is easily cleared up with antibiotics. If left untreated, however, trichomoniasis can lead to severe health problems, such as pelvic inflammatory disease or complications during pregnancy, such as premature labour.

How to treat trichomoniasis

In studying 7,593 US women 18 to 89 years old across 28 states, the researchers found that 8.7% tested positive for trichomoniasis, but the STI was more prevalent among older women. Thirteen percent of women 50 and older had the parasite, and women in their 40s trailed closely behind with an 11% infection rate, the study found.

Women in their 20s, on the other hand, had an infection rate of 8.3%.

"Trichomonas infections are quite treatable with antibiotics," said Gaydos. "And these high numbers really warrant older women getting screened by their family physicians and gynaecologists during routine check-ups to make sure they are not infected and are not inadvertently spreading it to others."

Infected people may not experience symptoms, which typically include liquid discharge from the vagina or penis, irritation while urinating and genital itching.

"What we are really witnessing with trichomonas, especially in older women, is that no one ever looked, no one ever tested and diagnosed, and no one is really getting treated, so the infection persists year after year," said Gaydos. The study authors added that federal agencies should require that trichomoniasis be reported to the CDC like other STIs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea, so that public health officials can better track and prevent the condition.

Men should also be tested and treated for trichomoniasis to reduce the risk of re-infection, particularly in situations involving multiple sex partners, the authors said.

Experts note that research presented at meetings is considered preliminary because it has not been subjected to the rigorous scrutiny required for publication in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

(Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)




Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Exercise benefits for seniors »

Working out in the concrete jungle Even a little exercise may help prevent dementia Here’s an unexpected way to boost your memory: running

Seniors who exercise recover more quickly from injury or illness

When sedentary older adults got into an exercise routine, it curbed their risk of suffering a disabling injury or illness and helped them recover if anything did happen to them.