20 March 2008

Circumcision only stops some STIs

While there is compelling evidence that circumcision protects men from contracting HIV, it is unclear whether circumcised men are at lower risk of other STIs, researchers say.

Circumcision does not appear to shield men from certain types of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) common in the developed world, according to new research from New Zealand.

While there is "compelling evidence" that circumcision protects men from contracting HIV through sex with women, it is unclear whether circumcised men are at lower risk of other types of STIs, Dr Nigel P. Dickson and colleagues note in their report in the Journal of Pediatrics.

To investigate, the researchers, at the University of Otago in Dunedin, followed 499 men born in 1972 and 1973 up to age 32. About 40 percent of the men had been circumcised in early childhood.

Among circumcised men, 23.4 percent reported having had any type of STI by age 32, compared to 23.5 percent of the uncircumcised men.

Most common infections
The most common STDs reported were genital warts, Chlamydia and genital herpes. There was no statistically significant difference in rates of STIs even after the researchers adjusted for sexual behavior and socioeconomic factors.

Another recent study from New Zealand found that circumcision appeared to halve the rate of STIs among men up to age 25, Dickson and his colleagues note. However, they add, that study was done in a smaller group of individuals with a lower rate of STIs than that reported in the current study, while fewer men in that group had been circumcised.

"Although the reason for the different findings in the 2 cohorts is unclear, when our findings are considered in the context of other recent population-based studies in developed countries, it appears unlikely that circumcision has a major protective effect against common sexually transmitted infections in these populations, although a small effect cannot be ruled out," the researchers conclude.

SOURCE: Journal of Pediatrics, March 2008. – (Reuters Health)

Read more:
Circumcision helps against HIV
Mass circumcision for SA?

March 2008




Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Exercise benefits for seniors »

Working out in the concrete jungle Even a little exercise may help prevent dementia Here’s an unexpected way to boost your memory: running

Seniors who exercise recover more quickly from injury or illness

When sedentary older adults got into an exercise routine, it curbed their risk of suffering a disabling injury or illness and helped them recover if anything did happen to them.