advertisement
18 November 2011

19 million new STIs each year

19 million new cases of syphilis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia are diagnosed in the United States each year and is costing the nations' health care billions of dollars.

0

The 19 million new cases of syphilis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia diagnosed in the United States each year cost the nation's health care system $17 billion (about R138 million) annually, according to an annual report released by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Most sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are treatable but can cause serious, life-long consequences, such as infertility, if they aren't detected.

"STIs are one of the most critical health challenges facing the nation today," CDC researchers said in their report.

Reported cases of chlamydia steadily increased for the past 20 years and reached 1.3 million in 2010. The increase stems from expanded screening efforts, not an actual rise in the number of people infected with chlamydia.

However, a majority of chlamydia infections still go undiagnosed, and fewer than half of sexually active young women undergo annual screening as recommended by the CDC.

Rates of gonorrhoea are at historic lows, but more than 300,000 cases were diagnosed in 2010. There are also indications that the disease may be developing resistance to the only available treatment option, according to the CDC.

The syphilis rate fell 1.6% from 2009 to 2010, its first decrease in a decade. But the rate among young black men rose 134% since 2006.

Syphilis has also increased significantly among young, black gay and bisexual men, which suggests that new infections in this group are fueling the overall rise in syphilis infections among young black men.

This is particularly concerning because there has also been a sharp increase in HIV infections in the black gay and bisexual population, the CDC said.

The report also noted ongoing health inequalities linked with STIs. Blacks and Hispanics are more affected by STIs than whites. This is because many of the same social and economic factors - such as low income and lack of access to health care - that place blacks and Hispanics at higher risk for other diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, also increase their risk for STIs.

In addition, young people represent 25% of people with sexual experience in the United States, but account for nearly half of new STDs, the CDC said.

While doctors must report cases of gonorrhoea, chlamydia, and syphilis to local or state health departments, other STDs, including human papillomavirus (HPV) and genital herpes, are not included in the reporting system. Because of this, the true incidence of STDs is underestimated, the CDC said.


(Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X

Help, my STI is incurable!

2016-09-30 14:41

More:

SexNews
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

The debate continues »

Working out in the concrete jungle 7 top butt exercises for guys 10 things pole dancing can do for you

The running vs. walking debate

There are many different theories when it comes to the running vs. walking for health and weight loss.

Veganism a crime? »

Running the Comrades Marathon on a vegan diet Are vegans unnatural beasts? Can a vegan be really healthy?

Should it be a crime to raise a baby on vegan food?

After a number of cases of malnourishment in Italy, it may become a crime to feed children under 16 a vegan diet.