14 October 2016

The only 5 egg techniques you need to crack

Soft-boiled eggs breaking apart? Omelette sticking to the pan? It doesn’t have to be that way



Whisk 10 free-range eggs with ¼ cup cream.

Melt 80 g butter in a large pan over a low heat, then add the eggs.

Using a wide spatula, gently fold the eggs away from or towards yourself (not in both directions) rather than stirring, to keep them light and fluffy.

Once the eggs begin to set into larger folds, remove the pan from the heat.

Season to taste.


Liberally coat the base of a nonstick pan with olive oil, then place over a medium to high heat. Crack 2 free-range eggs into the pan. Make sure the oil doesn’t get too hot. Spoon the hot oil over the egg whites, or place a loose-fitting lid over the pan for 30 seconds to 1 minute.


Bring a medium saucepan of water and 2–3 T white vinegar to the boil. Reduce the heat until the water is barely bubbling, then stir using a slotted spoon to create a whirlpool. Break a free-range egg into a tea cup, then carefully tip it into the swirling centre and simmer for 2–3 minutes for a soft egg. Cook for a minute or two longer for a harder egg. Remove using a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper.


Whisk 4–6 free-range eggs and season to taste. Heat 2 T olive oil in a nonstick pan over a medium heat, then pour in the beaten eggs, swirling them around. Once the eggs are almost set in the middle, spoon the filling of your choice onto one half of the omelette. Loosen the edges of the uncovered half using a spatula, then flip onto the side covered by the toppings. Cook for a further 20 seconds, then slide out of the pan onto a plate. 


Heat a small saucepan of water over a high heat and, just before it starts to boil, slowly add 4 free-range eggs. Make sure they are completely submerged. For soft-boiled, simmer for 5–6 minutes. For medium-soft, 7 minutes. For medium-hard, 9 minutes. For hard-boiled, 11 minutes. Drain and rinse in cold water.

Stock up on the best quality free-range eggs here.


Live healthier

Exercise benefits for seniors »

Working out in the concrete jungle Even a little exercise may help prevent dementia Here’s an unexpected way to boost your memory: running

Seniors who exercise recover more quickly from injury or illness

When sedentary older adults got into an exercise routine, it curbed their risk of suffering a disabling injury or illness and helped them recover if anything did happen to them.