advertisement
11 March 2011

Mom's bad eating may lead to obese kids

Newborns with a low birth weight due to their mother's poor nutrition during pregnancy may be "programmed" to eat more, research in animals suggests.

0

Newborns with a low birth weight due to their mother's poor nutrition during pregnancy may be "programmed" to eat more, research in animals suggests.

The finding may help explain the connection between low birth weight and obesity later in life, and also highlights the importance of good nutrition for pregnant women, according to researchers at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed).

Their work with laboratory animals found that newborns with low birth weight had fewer neurons in the area of the brain that controls food intake than those with a normal birth weight.

The researchers noted that previous studies have shown that babies that have a low birth weight and then experience an accelerated "catch-up" growth are at increased risk for health problems later in life, such as obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and osteoporosis.

The study is published in the journal Brain Research.

"This study demonstrates the importance of maternal nutrition and health in reducing obesity," co-author Dr Mina Desai said in an LA BioMed news release. "Obesity and its related diseases are the leading cause of death in our society, yet we have few effective strategies for prevention or treatment. These studies suggest maternal nutrition could play a critical role in preventing obesity and related disease."


(Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Wasting water? »

South Africa is facing a water crisis Water saving tips Water quality report shocks

SEE: How much water do you use per day?

With level 4 water restrictions in Cape Town, residents are urged to use a maximum of 100 litres per person per day. Here’s how quickly it adds up.

Life saving tip! »

SEE: 10 things to keep in your first aid kit 10 first aid myths

Here's why you need a first aid kit in the car

Emergency services are often spread thin, especially when storms and major disasters strike. When travelling on the road, having a well-stocked first aid kit could be a lifesaver.