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13 July 2012

Concern over bogus initiation schools

The SA Men's Action Group (SAMAG) has called on traditional leaders to curb the spread of bogus initiation schools.

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 The SA Men's Action Group (SAMAG) has called on traditional leaders to curb the spread of bogus initiation schools.

"We have as nation experienced in the recent past the mushrooming of bogus initiation schools," SAMAG said. These schools had led "to the brutal killing of young men and mutilation of their genitalia".

Those running the schools were evidently motivated by greed and lacked respect for individuals' dignity and the rule of law.

"With reports of death and amputations of penises in the Eastern Cape, Free State and Limpopo this is no more a worrying trend, but a human rights issue," SAMAG said.

Boys dying at schools

Over 200 initiates had died in the past four years. Others had undergone penis amputations or received other medical treatment as a result of complications following the procedure.

The Congress of Traditional Leaders of SA, the House of Traditional Leaders, professionals, and others should support corrective measures to stop the scourge.

"We condemn all illegal practices that accompany these bogus initiation schools and ill-disciplined and greedy "traditional surgeons" that put profits before our young men's lives," it said.

(Sapa, July 2012)

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