advertisement
Updated 03 September 2015

Earwax

Despite its name, ear wax is not "wax," but a mixture of secretions from the outer ear, along with dead skin cells and hair. It is normal and necessary for healthy ears, acting as a self-cleaning agent with lubricating and antibacterial properties. However, earwax can accumulate inside the ear to the point where it causes an impaction and symptoms including hearing loss, "ringing" in the ears, pain or a feeling of fullness in the ear. In those cases, wax removal may be necessary. Don't use cotton swabs which only push the wax further into the ear and avoid home oral jet irrigators and ear candling. Bulb syringes are a good choice, or ask your doctor to remove it.

0
Despite its name, earwax is not "wax," but a mixture of secretions from the outer ear, along with dead skin cells and hair. It is normal and necessary for healthy ears, acting as a self-cleaning agent with lubricating and antibacterial properties. However, ear wax can accumulate inside the ear to the point where it causes an impaction and symptoms including hearing loss, "ringing" in the ears, pain or a feeling of fullness in the ear. In those cases, wax removal may be necessary. Don't use cotton swabs which only push the wax further into the ear and avoid home oral jet irrigators and ear candling. Bulb syringes are a good choice, or simply see your doctor.
 
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Watch out! »

Gross fungal infections you can pick up at the gym

You go to gym to exercise. But make sure the only thing you pick up is a dumbbell and not one of these gross fungal infections.

Holiday health »

Your 10-step asthma holiday checklist

Don’t let asthma ruin your summer holiday. Whether you are travelling or embracing the summer at home, make sure you plan ahead.