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Updated 26 August 2017

'I got the orgasm shot – and this is what happened'

Would you get an injection down there if it gave you this result?

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Dr Nicole Kanaris, aesthetic doctor and founder of MedAesthetique, is one of only eight doctors in SA who has been trained to administer the O-Shot or Orgasm Shot, a trademarked procedure with a variety of sexual and medical benefits.

Developed by Dr Charles Runels in the US, the procedure has only been around since 2011. Kanaris travelled to Beverly Hills in 2016 to train in giving this 30-minute treatment.

Read more: “I cheated on my husband – and this is why I did it”

A vampire facial for your vagina

The O-shot involves injecting platelet-rich Plasma (PRP) into a patient. “Half a tablespoon of blood is drawn from the client’s arm in the same way as any blood test,” explains Kanaris. “It is then spun in a centrifuge, which allows for the blood components to separate, isolating the plateletrich plasma.”

This plasma is injected into the client’s genitalia (near the clitoris and vaginal wall), where it stimulates growth and repair because it contains several different growth factors and other cytokines that stimulate the healing of soft tissue.

The shot comes with a range of benefits that include easier arousal, better orgasms, G-spot orgasms, increased lubrication and reduced pain during sex. It can also provide relief from urinary incontinence.

Read more: 4 common reasons why you’re suffering from vaginal dryness

Squeezing your legs together and squirming?

The area is thoroughly numbed before the plasma is injected and, says Kanaris, the procedure is almost pain-free. “The highest pain rating I’ve received from a patient is two out of 10.”

According to Kanaris, five out of 10 women suffer from pain during sex, decreased desire or the inability to experience orgasm and four out of 10 women have sexual dysfunction to the point of serious psychological distress.

So, many women could benefit from receiving the shot. It could also help women regain feeling that was lost during childbirth. “Patients who have had natural birth and feel a loss of sensation or less sensation during sex would benefit. Also patients who feel they’ve lost elasticity in the area,” says Kanaris.

Read more: “I watched porn with my partner for the first time – this is what happened”

Sex tip she swears by

Giving birth vaginally can increase your chances of developing stress urinary incontinence because it can cause weakening of the muscles that support the bladder. “When those muscles weaken, anything that exerts force on the abdominal and pelvic muscles can put pressure on your bladder and cause urine leakage,” explains Kanaris, including having sex, sneezing, coughing, laughing, lifting something heavy or exercising. There are a number of different treatments, including Kegel exercises, bladder training, surgery and the O-Shot. Talk to your doctor to find the treatment that will work best for you.

Read more: 5 gynaes share the sex tips that have changed their patients’ lives

What it's like to get the O-shot – from a woman who tried it

Why did you get the o-shot?

I had been researching different options in a desperate attempt to 'cure' my recent lack of sex drive and dryness during intercourse. Since the birth of my child – by Caesarian section – my sex life hadn’t been the same.

What were your symptoms?

I’d have pain during intercourse because I had no natural lubrication and would hardly ever orgasm.

How bad were your symptoms?

It had gotten to the point where it started taking a toll on my relationship because I no longer wanted to have sex – it was too painful.

Did your symptoms go away completely?

Yes. It has definitely made my G-spot more sensitive, making orgasms great and no more pain at all.

How painful was it?

I had a very slight burning sensation during the procedure, but no pain once it was done.

Would you do it again?

I would definitely go back to Dr Kanaris and do the O-Shot again. I actually want to have sex now, which in turn has improved my relationship.

Image credit: iStock

This article was originally published on www.womenshealthsa.co.za

 
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