17 November 2014

New drug regimen cures post liver transplant hep C

Patients with hepatitis C after a liver transplant can now be treated successfully with drugs that are well tolerated and without risk of rejection.


A new drug regimen is producing high cure rates in small groups of liver transplant patients with hepatitis C, researchers report.

Difficult to treat

The study's results are a "landmark achievement", said study first author Dr. Paul Kwo, professor of medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine, in a university news release.

"Recurrent hepatitis C post-liver transplantation has historically been difficult to treat, and we have considered post-liver transplant patients a special population in need of new treatment strategies," Kwo said.

Read: Hepatitis C virus

"What this study showed is that this special population is no longer special. We can treat them as successfully as if they haven't had a liver transplant with drugs that are well tolerated and without risk of rejection," he explained.

Kwo said liver transplantation in the United States is mainly the result of cirrhosis – liver scarring – caused by hepatitis C. Liver transplant patients with the condition face a 20 to 30 percent chance of developing cirrhosis again within five years.

Regimen still investigational

The current standard treatment involves interferon, which usually requires 48 weeks of treatment. This treatment can also lead to problems like organ rejection and a low response rate, according to information provided by Indiana University.

The new treatment, which includes the drugs ABT-450, ombitasvir and dasabuvir (with or without ribavirin), is administered for 24 weeks. Researchers say this regimen's side effect rate and risk of transplant rejection appears to be much lower than for treatment with interferon.

Read: Moderate drinking also risky with hepatitis C

The new three-drug regimen cured hepatitis C 97 percent of the time in 34 people who'd had a liver transplant, but didn't have cirrhosis. The cure rate was 96 percent in patients with cirrhosis, the researchers said.

The current study was a phase 2 clinical trial, and the new regimen is still considered investigational, according to the researchers.

The study appears in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Read more:

Combination hepatitis C drug brings new hope
Fast, cheap test for hepatitis C
US: hepatitis C kills more than HIV

Image: Male liver anatomy from Shutterstock

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved.




Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Exercise benefits for seniors »

Working out in the concrete jungle Even a little exercise may help prevent dementia Here’s an unexpected way to boost your memory: running

Seniors who exercise recover more quickly from injury or illness

When sedentary older adults got into an exercise routine, it curbed their risk of suffering a disabling injury or illness and helped them recover if anything did happen to them.