Updated 22 August 2014

SA's largest health care convention to take place on Monday

Over 1000 practitioners in the private health care sector will converge at Durban’s ICC on Monday for discussions and debates around some of the most critical socioeconomic issues facing SA.


Entitled “Waves of Change”, the 15th Annual Board of Healthcare Funders (BHF) Southern African Conference will tackle the issues of a private health care sector which is in flux as the days of business as usual are over.

According to Dr Rajesh Patel, Chairman of the BHF, the  convention’s primary focus will be on the tools required to achieve an efficiency-based, patient-centred private health care system. 

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Strategic leadership, collective activism, the Value Agenda and the expansion of the role of schemes, are four key themes to be covered by top international and local speakers.

KPMG, one of the sponsors for an event at BHF and the pre-eminent pan-African Healthcare Advisory practice, is bringing out one of three international health experts, Lord Nigel Crisp (an independent Member of the House of Lords and Global advisor to KPMG).

Lord Crisp, who recently wrote a much anticipated book with South Africa’s Minister of Health and other Ministers of Health across Africa entitled “African Health Leaders – Making Change and Claiming the Future”, will be sharing insights on the theme of The Value Agenda, following an address by the SA Minister of Health.

“Engagement, debate and collaboration are critical elements of a robust healthcare system”, says Dr Anushka Coovadia, Africa Healthcare Lead for KPMG and one of the local speakers who will continue the debate on this theme. 

“We fully support a forum which promotes the development of these essential components which are needed to build social cohesion and intersectoral trust”.

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Coovadia adds that the value agenda is considered a crucial concept for health care reform in South Africa.

She will be covering the issues of the activist payer, the implications of expanding coverage into the employed, uninsured marketing in South Africa and the provision of low-cost, high quality care in BRICS countries.

KPMG’s investment in the conference is part of the group’s significant contribution to pan-African Healthcare advisory services over the past 3 years.

According to Anthony Thunstrom, KPMG did this slightly ahead of the curve because it saw the demand growing from both the public and private sectors, throughout the continent. 

“As of today, we are advising both a number of African governments around the reforms critical to their own healthcare policies, that will help to propel their economies towards further sustainable growth, as well as a number of Private Equity funds around private sector healthcare investments.”

Other international speakers include CEO of private health care in Australia , The Honourable Dr Michael Armitage, and Berlin-based health economist and public health specialist, Professor Michael Thiede, who is grappling with the issue of maximising value for patients by setting the right incentives in health care delivery, smart reimbursement mechanisms and alternative funding and delivery models.

Local expert speakers include Professor Hoosen ‘Jerry’ Coovadia- Member of the National Planning Commission and healthcare activist, Professor Nick Binedell- Expert in the field of Strategic Leadership and  Dean of GIBS and Dr Jonathan Broomberg-  CEO of Discovery Health.

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