advertisement
07 July 2014

Californian survives shark attack

A California swimmer encounters a face-to-face encounter with a great white shark and lives to tell the tale.

0

Steven Robles was an hour into his regular weekend swim off some of Southern California's most popular beaches when he came face-to-face with a great white shark.

The 2.13-metre-long juvenile had been trying to free itself from a fisherman's hook for about half an hour.

'I'm going to die'
"It came up to the surface, it looked at me and attacked me right on the side of my chest," Robles told KABC-TV. "That all happened within two seconds, I saw the eyes of the shark as I was seeing it swim toward me. It lunged at my chest, and it locked into my chest."

As a reflex, he tried to pry open the shark's mouth.

"I was like, 'Oh my God, this is it. Oh my God, I'm going to die. This is really, this is it,'" Robles told CNN.

And then, just as quickly as it struck, the shark let go and swam away.
Read: Shark attacks on the increase?

Robles was familiar with the waters of the Southern California coast. His Saturday morning routine included a swim from Hermosa Beach north to Manhattan Beach with fellow amateur distance swimmers, and last summer he completed a difficult swim approximately 20 miles (32 kilometres) from Santa Catalina Island to the Rancho Palos Verdes peninsula to raise money for a school in Nicaragua.

Extremities intact
Robles had been going for 2 miles with about a dozen friends on Saturday when he encountered the shark around 9:30 a.m., fellow swimmer Nader Nejadhashemi said Sunday.

"He said 'I've been bit,' and he was screaming," said Nejadhashemi, who didn't see the shark even though he was just 5 feet away.

At first Nejadhashemi thought it must be a cramp. "Then," he said, "I saw the blood."
Read: Tourist dies in shark attack in Eastern Cape

Nejadhashemi reached his friend and checked that "all his extremities were intact," then comforted him as others in the group flagged a nearby paddle boarder.

Robles was taken to the hospital but by Sunday morning had been released. He did not return messages left Sunday at several numbers listed under his name.

Sightings on the rise
It's illegal to fish for great white sharks. The fisherman told several local media that he was trying to catch a bat ray, not a shark, and that he didn't cut the line sooner because of how many swimmers were in the water. It wasn't immediately clear whether the wildlife officials were investigating; a department spokeswoman did not return calls seeking comment.

Shark sightings are on the rise at some Southern California beaches, especially in the waters off Manhattan Beach, which is a popular spot for surfers and paddle boarders but also has long been identified as a pupping ground for white sharks. A life-sized model of a white shark is displayed outside an aquarium on the pier, with an explanation that juvenile sharks are common in the area.

Read  more:
Tips for avoiding shark attack
Victims unite to save sharks
Shark blood may fight cancer

AP

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X

More:

News
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

The debate continues »

Working out in the concrete jungle 7 top butt exercises for guys 10 things pole dancing can do for you

The running vs. walking debate

There are many different theories when it comes to the running vs. walking for health and weight loss.

Veganism a crime? »

Running the Comrades Marathon on a vegan diet Are vegans unnatural beasts? Can a vegan be really healthy?

Should it be a crime to raise a baby on vegan food?

After a number of cases of malnourishment in Italy, it may become a crime to feed children under 16 a vegan diet.