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22 September 2014

Angelina Jolie inspires rise in breast cancer testing

By going public with her double mastectomy last year, Angelina Jolie inspired women worldwide to fight breast cancer.

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Hollywood star Angelina Jolie's decision to make public her double mastectomy more than doubled the number of women in Britain seeking to have genetic breast cancer tests, according to a new study.


'Angelina effect'

Jolie, 39, who has become a high-profile human rights campaign, announced her surgery in May last year, saying she acted after testing positive for a mutation of the BRCA1 gene that significantly increases the risk of breast cancer.

Read: Angelina: preventative breast removal

She said she was going public with news of her surgery as she hoped her story would inspire other women to fight the life-threatening disease.

Researchers studied 21 clinics and regional genetic centres and found there were 4,847 referrals for testing in June and July last year compared to 1,981 in the same period of 2012.

The study of the so-called "Angelina effect", published online in the journal Breast Cancer Research, credited Jolie's glamorous appearance and relationship with Hollywood actor Brad Pitt for helping to lessen women's fears about surgery.

"Angelina Jolie ... is likely to have had a bigger impact than other celebrity announcements, possibly due to her image as glamorous and strong woman," researcher Gareth Evans of the charity Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention said in a statement.

Early testing for mutation

"This may have lessened patients' fears about a loss of sexual identity post-preventative surgery and encouraged those who had not previously engaged with health services to consider genetic testing."

"These high-profile cases often mean that more women are inclined to contact centres such as Genesis – and other family history clinics– so that they can be tested for the mutation early and take the necessary steps to prevent themselves from developing the disease," he continued.

Read: Breast Cancer: A life-saving 10 minutes

"Of course, in some cases this may mean a risk-reducing mastectomy, however cancer preventing drugs, such as tamoxifen, and certain lifestyle changes like a healthy diet and more exercise, are also options which many women may consider."

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. The World Health Organisation estimated that more than 521,000 women died of breast cancer in 2012.

Oscar-winning Jolie has in recent years drawn nearly as much attention for her globe-trotting work on behalf of refugees and victims of sexual violence in conflicts as for her acting.

Jolie was named a Goodwill Ambassador for the UNHCR in 2001 and promoted to be Special Envoy to High Commissioner Antonio Guterres in 2012. Since 2012 she has also led a campaign against sexual violence in conflict zones.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1u5z5nc Breast Cancer Research, September 18, 2014.

Read more:

Jolie sets good example by careful weighing of risks
New research on 'Angelina Jolie' breast cancer genes
Angelina's double mastectomy safest choice for some women

Image: Female breast anatomy from Shutterstock

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