advertisement
12 March 2010

Seaweed may help treat lymphoma

Seaweed extract has the potential to become a treatment for the immune system cancer known as lymphoma, according to the results of preliminary research.

0

Seaweed extract has the potential to become a treatment for the immune system cancer known as lymphoma, according to the results of preliminary research.

In the study, researchers experimented with compounds derived from seaweed and used them to treat the types of lymphoma that are classified as being in the B-cell group.

"Some forms of B-cell lymphoma are especially resistant to standard treatment, and thus new therapies are needed," Mohammad Irhimeh, assistant professor of haematology/oncology and stem cells at the Hashemite University in Jordan, said in a news release from the American Association for Cancer Research.

Scientists had previously reported that a compound called fucoidan, found in seaweed, appears to kill tumor cells in mice and human cells.

In the new study, Irhimeh and his colleagues tested human lymphoma cells with a type of seaweed extract that is sold commercially. They found that it inhibited growth of cancerous cells but did not affect healthy cells.

The findings were to be presented March 11 at the American Association for Cancer Research's Dead Sea International Conference on Advances in Cancer Research, held in Jordan. - (HealthDay News, March 2010)

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Dangerous winter sun »

Why female students ignore the risks of indoor tanning Can rooibos protect you from the effects of UVB exposure?

Skin cancer always a risk – even in winter

During winter, the risk of skin cancer doesn’t disappear. CyberDoc talks to us about when to see your doctor about a strange-looking mole or spot.

Did you know? »

The 5 saltiest foods may surprise you Craving salt? Your genes may be the reason

10 fascinating facts about salt

The one thing that fast foods, whether it be chips, hamburgers, pretzels or fried chicken have in common, is loads of salt.