14 February 2012

Get your energy fix

What saps our energy? Well, stimulants like tea and coffee, chocolate and cigarettes can have negative effects on your energy levels. So can stress.


What saps our energy? Well, stimulants like tea and coffee, chocolate and cigarettes that give you a short-term boost and have negative effects on your energy levels in the long-run. Stress also plays its part and emotional traumas too.

If it's energy you need, then you're first going to have to cut out or at least cut down on stimulants and you're also going to have to find ways of managing, reducing or learning to cope with stress.

While going cold turkey, there are fortunately some natural ways to boost your vitality.

Eating for energy

Indian yogic philosophy: After eating a meal, one-half of your stomach should be filled with food and one-quarter water and the remaining one-quarter should be left over for prana (life force). Bear this in mind when planning your meals.

Energy foods: Porridge is a complex carbohydrate, so if you have it for breakfast it will release energy slowly all day. Avoid refined carbohydrates like white bread, white pasta and white rice, as these foods will make you feel sluggish and sleepy.

Eat at least one clove of garlic a day. Garlic is not only packed with immune-strengthening antioxidants, contains the mineral germanium that will improve energy production.

Snack, don't feast. Big, stodgy meals take a heavy toll on your digestive system, which in turn, saps precious energy, leaving you feeling tired and listless.

- (Health24, updated February 2012)


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