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Updated 18 February 2013

Ladies mantle (Alchemilla vulgaris)

Ladies mantle was named in the 16th century by Jerome Bock, also known as Tragus, and it appears under his name in the book History of Plants, published in 1532. Ladies mantle is referred to as lady's cloak or mantle because of its association with the Virgin Mary. The lobes of the leaf are said to resemble the scalloped edges of a mantle. It has also been referred to as lion's foot and bear's foot, most likely because of the resemblance of its spreading root leaves to such feet.

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RELATED TERMS

Alchemillae herba, bear's foot, common ladies mantle, ellagic acid, flavonoids, Frauenmantle, Frauenmantelkraut, ladies cloak, leontopodium, lion's foot, nine hooks, pied-de-lion, quercetol, quercetin, stellaria, tannins.

BACKGROUND

Ladies mantle was named in the 16th century by Jerome Bock, also known as Tragus, and it appears under his name in the book History of Plants, published in 1532. Ladies mantle is referred to as lady's cloak or mantle because of its association with the Virgin Mary. The lobes of the leaf are said to resemble the scalloped edges of a mantle. It has also been referred to as lion's foot and bear's foot, most likely because of the resemblance of its spreading root leaves to such feet.

Ladies mantle has been used for many centuries in Europe including in Sweden and Germany. Some experts consider ladies mantle to be good for treating wounds due to its coagulation (blood clotting), astringent and styptic (stops bleeding) properties. It has also been used as a mouth rinse after dental procedures to help stop bleeding. Ladies mantle has been used for a variety of female conditions such as menstrual disorders including excessive menstruation and menopause, as an aid during conception, in the prevention of miscarriages, and to help the body heal after childbirth. However, clinical data is lacking.

EVIDENCE TABLE

Conditions

Uses
disclaimer: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.
Grade*

*Key to grades: A: Strong scientific evidence for this use; B: Good scientific evidence for this use; C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use; D: Fair scientific evidence against this use (it may not work); F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likely does not work).

TRADITION

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below. Acne, anti-convulsant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hemorrhagic, appetite stimulant, astringent, coagulation (blood clotting), diabetes, diarrhea, diuretic, fertility (conception aid), fibroids (benign tumors in or around the uterus that sometimes can cause miscarriages), child birth (healing aid), high blood pressure, hormone imbalances (estrogen or testosterone), menopause, menorrhagia (excessive menstruation), miscarriage (prevention), rheumatism, sleep aid, stomach problems, styptic (stops bleeding), wound healing.

DOSING

disclaimer: The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for ladies mantle. Traditionally, drinking a tea made by steeping the chopped leaves in hot water for 15 minutes, then straining and ingesting for 20 consecutive days, has been used as a conception aid. To treat excessive menstruation, one ounce of dried herb has been infused in one pint of boiling water to make a tea. This tea is then consumed in amounts similar to a teacupful (size of teacup not stated). Ladies mantle has also been used as a vaginal douche to treat leukorrhea (vaginal discharge).

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for ladies mantle in children.

SAFETY

disclaimer: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to ladies mantle.

Side Effects and Warnings

The lack of formal clinical trials makes it difficult to draw any conclusions regarding the safety of ladies mantle. Nonetheless, ladies mantle is possibly unsafe in patients using medications to prevent coagulation of the blood (e.g. warfarin) due to its theoretical use as a coagulant. It is also possibly unsafe in patients with iron deficiency anemia because ladies mantle may contain tannins, which may reduce the absorption of iron supplements.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

Ladies mantle is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Traditionally, ladies mantle has been used as a conception aid and for excessive menstruation.

INTERACTIONS

disclaimer: Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

Interactions with Drugs

Theoretically, ladies mantle should be avoided in patients using anti-coagulation therapy, such as warfarin (Coumadin©). Ladies mantle may decrease the efficacy of these medications due to its proposed coagulation (blood clotting) effects.

Interactions with Herbs & Dietary Supplements

Theoretically, ladies mantle should be avoided in patients taking anti-coagulation (blood thinning) herbs or supplements. Ladies mantle may decrease the efficacy of these agents due to its proposed coagulation (blood clotting) effects.

Ladies mantle contains tannins, which may reduce the absorption of iron supplements.

Ladies mantle has been shown to have a weak mutagenic effect (cause changes in the DNA of cells) on bacteria and it is proposed that the constituent quercetin is the cause of the mutagenic activity. Taking both quercetin and ladies mantle may increase this effect.

ATTRIBUTION

This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

  • Fraisse D, Carnat A, Carnat AP, et al. [Standardization of the aerial parts of Alchemilla]. Ann.Pharm Fr. 1999;57(5):401-405. View abstract
  • Nihoul-Ghenne L. [Presence of Alchemilla alpina L. together with Alchemilla vulgaris L. in a tea for high blood pressure.]. J Pharm Belg. 1950;5(11-12):335-338. View abstract
  • Schimmer O, Hafele F, Kruger A. The mutagenic potencies of plant extracts containing quercetin in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. Mutat.Res 1988;206(2):201-208. View abstract
  • Schimmer O, Kruger A, Paulini H, et al. An evaluation of 55 commercial plant extracts in the Ames mutagenicity test. Pharmazie 1994;49(6):448-451. View abstract
  • Swanston-Flatt SK, Day C, Bailey CJ, et al. Traditional plant treatments for diabetes. Studies in normal and streptozotocin diabetic mice. Diabetologia 1990;33(8):462-464. View abstract
disclaimer: Natural Standard Bottom Line Monograph, Copyright © 2011 (www.naturalstandard.com). Commercial distribution prohibited. This monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. You should consult with a qualified healthcare provider before making decisions about therapies and/or health conditions. disclaimer: While some complementary and alternative techniques have been studied scientifically, high-quality data regarding safety, effectiveness, and mechanism of action are limited or controversial for most therapies. Whenever possible, it is recommended that practitioners be licensed by a recognized professional organization that adheres to clearly published standards. In addition, before starting a new technique or engaging a practitioner, it is recommended that patients speak with their primary healthcare provider(s). Potential benefits, risks (including financial costs), and alternatives should be carefully considered. The below monograph is designed to provide historical background and an overview of clinically-oriented research, and neither advocates for or against the use of a particular therapy. disclaimer: The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)



Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)
 
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