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27 February 2012

Lefties hold phone to left ear

About 70% of people hold their cellphone to the ear on the same side as their dominant hand, a new study finds.

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About 70% of people hold their cellphone to the ear on the same side as their dominant hand, a new study finds.

Left-brain thinkers are more likely to use their right hand for writing and other everyday tasks. They're also more likely to hold their cellphone to their right ear, even though there's no difference in hearing between their right and left ears.

The reverse is true for people who are left-handed and right-brain dominant, according to the study by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.
 
Their online survey of more than 700 people found that 68% of right-handed people said they held their cellphone to their right ear, while 25% used the left ear, and 7% used both ears.

Among left-handed people, 72% said they held their cell phone to their left ear, 23% used their right ear, and 5% used both ears.

Mapping the language of the brain

"Our findings have several implications, especially for mapping the language center of the brain," Dr. Michael Seidman, director of the division of otologic and neurotologic surgery in the department of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, said in a Henry Ford Health System news release.

The findings also suggest that there's no link between cellphone use and brain, and head and neck tumors, according to Seidman.

If there were a connection, far more people would be diagnosed on the right side of their brain, head and neck because most people are right-handed and hold their cell phones to their right ear, he said.

Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Read more:

More left handed people have sleep disorder
 


(Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

This article has not necessarily been edited by Health24.

 
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