08 August 2006

How did you wake up this morning?

How do you wake up in the mornings? Have a look at what happens to your body before you open your eyes in the morning.

How did you wake up this morning? Most people have set routines, so they need to wake up at the same time most mornings of the week.

Unless you went to bed very late, your body starts to emerge from a very deep sleep about one hour before you actually wake up. During this hour your blood pressure starts to rise slowly, your heart rate quickens and your metabolic rate starts increasing.

The alarm going off, is, however, often a shock to people. A sudden noise like that signals danger to the body, which has a sudden stress reaction. The body is preparing itself for possible danger and there is a sudden increase of heart rate and breathing and the muscles tense.

Because many people dislike starting their day in this way, there are now devices on the market that will wake you up more gently – flashing lights, soothing music or someone talking in a soothing manner.

Things to remember

  • Go to bed at more or less the same time during the week
  • Limit caffeine and alcohol intake in the evenings as these can lead to sleep disturbances
  • Make sure that your room is adequately heated, otherwise getting up in the morning can be very unpleasant
  • Unless you have difficulty in waking up, opt for a rather more soothing waking mechanism than a screeching alarm clock – who wants to start the day with adrenaline pumping through your body?

“Start off every day with a smile and get it over with.” W.C. Fields


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