11 July 2007

How to deal with panic attacks

Anyone who has ever suffered panic attacks knows they are humiliating, debilitating, and terribly frightening.

Pounding heart, shortness of breath, sweating, fear of losing control or of dying. Do these symptoms sound familiar?

These are some of the typical symptoms of a panic attack. Here are fourteen “on the spot” tips to get through such an attack.

  • Take "time out" and slow down. Slow your rate of breathing, slow your racing thoughts, slow your entire body, head to toe. Then slowly resume your previous activities.
  • Picture a relaxing scene using all your senses. Now put yourself into the scene.
  • If there are places available, take a stroll. If there are people available, talk to one of them.
  • Picture a person you trust, someone who believes in you, supports you and cares about your well-being. Now imagine the person is with you, offering you encouragement.
  • Recall a time you handled a similar situation well, or try to bring to mind a past success and the good feelings you experienced at that time.
  • Focus on the present, on concrete objects around you. Make a game of noticing details or inventing questions about every object you identify.
  • Count backwards from 20 and with every number, picture a different image of someone you love, something that pleases you, something that calms you. These might be images you recall from the past or those you only imagine.
  • Occupy your mind with an absorbing task. Plan your schedule for the day or the evening; try to recall the name of all the Clint Eastwood movies you have ever seen; plan a sumptuous meal, appetiser through to dessert, and imagine yourself eating one bite of every course.
  • Bring to mind the image of a person you admire and imagine yourself to actually be that person. Think as they might think, act as they might act, even feel as they might feel.
  • Remind yourself that attacks always end. Always.
  • Remind yourself that panic is not dangerous.
  • Take a giant yawn and stretch your body, head to toe.
  • Get mad. Vow not to let panic win out. You deserve better.
  • If all else fails, take as deep a breath as you can and hold it as long as you can. Use one of the other strategies to occupy your mind. Your physical symptoms should come down and stay down.

Information supplied by the Depression and Anxiety Support Group of South Africa.

Related Articles
Post a question to Cybershrink.
Panic Disorder


Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Exercise benefits for seniors »

Working out in the concrete jungle Even a little exercise may help prevent dementia Here’s an unexpected way to boost your memory: running

Seniors who exercise recover more quickly from injury or illness

When sedentary older adults got into an exercise routine, it curbed their risk of suffering a disabling injury or illness and helped them recover if anything did happen to them.