09 February 2015

FDA approves drug for binge-eating disorder

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved Vyvanse, a drug that treats adults with binge-eating disorder.


Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with recurring bouts of compulsive overeating known as binge-eating disorder.

Embarrassment and social isolation

It's the first drug sanctioned in the United States to treat the disorder, the agency said in a news release. Vyvanse was first approved in 2007 to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for those aged six and older.

People with binge-eating disorder eat when they are not hungry, often to the point of being uncomfortably full, the FDA said. This may lead to embarrassment and social isolation.

Vyvanse's safety and effectiveness in treating binge-eating disorder were evaluated in clinical studies involving 724 people. A central nervous system stimulant, Vyvanse could cause serious complications including stroke and heart attack. It also could cause sudden death among users with heart problems, the FDA said.

Less serious side effects could include dry mouth, insomnia, increased heart rate, constipation, anxiety and feeling jittery.

The drug is marketed by Shire U.S., based in Wayne, Pensyllvania.

More information

The FDA has more about this approval.

Investigating binge eating disorder
How to treat binge eating disorder
Binge-eating kids may also do drugs

Image: Binge-eater from Shutterstock

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