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23 October 2008

Scientists see memories form

A brain builds its abilities through experience, making physical connections between neurons and organising circuits to store and retrieve information for years afterwards.

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A brain isn't born fully organised. It builds its abilities through experience, making physical connections between neurons and organising circuits to store and retrieve information in milliseconds for years afterwards.

Now that process has been caught in the act for the first time by a Duke University research team that watched a naïve brain organise itself to interpret images of motion.

"This is the first time that anyone has been able to watch as visual experience selectively shapes the functional properties of individual neurons," said Professor David Fitzpatrick of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. "These results emphasise just how important experience is for the early development of brain circuits." The group's findings appear in the journal Nature.

See inside the brain
Using an advanced imaging system that can see changes in calcium levels within individual neurons as an indication of electrical activity, the team has been able to see inside the brain of a one-month old ferret as it opened its eyes for the first time and learned how to interpret moving images.

They watched the brain learning how to see. As the ferret learned to discriminate one pattern of motion from another over the course of a few hours, the researchers could see large numbers of individual neurons in the visual cortex develop specific responses and become organised into functional assemblies called cortical columns. Additional experiments confirmed that the changes were dependent on the neurons being activated by the animal's experience with moving visual images.

The measurements were made using something called in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy, which allows researchers to focus on a virtual slice of living tissue a few microns thick, and up to 300 microns below the surface of the brain. By scanning at multiple depths, the researchers were able to examine the properties of hundreds of neurons in a single animal. A fluorescent dye sensitive to calcium allowed the scientists to detect changes in the activity of individual neurons as the learning occurred.

First images captured
Ferrets are born with their eyes closed and remain so for the first 30 days or so, Fitzpatrick explained. What the Duke team saw happening as the animals opened their eyes and watched moving images for the first time was the emergence of columns of neurons sensitive to a particular feature of the visual stimulus: its direction of motion.

In visual areas of the mature brain, individual neurons are programmed to be most responsive to a particular direction of motion. Some are most responsive to left-to-right motion, for example, and others will be most responsive to down-to-up or right-to-left and so on. As signals from a visual stimulus enter these brain centres for interpretation, the entire collection of neurons that has been programmed to detect motion will fire signals to cast their votes, in effect, on which direction the stimulus is moving. Those neurons which are programmed to be most responsive to the direction the stimulus is actually moving cast the "loudest" votes.

Knowledge through experience
"Before experience with a moving stimulus, individual neurons respond almost equally to opposite directions of motion and there is little order in the way they are arranged," Fitzpatrick said. "But as a result of experience with moving images, their response to a particular direction of motion strengthens and they begin to act like their neighbours, forming columns of neurons with similar preferences. We have been able to visualise the self-organising process by which the brain uses experience to guide the construction of circuits that are critical for interpreting moving stimuli."

The scientists next have to figure out how neurons end up preferring one motion direction over another, and what aspects of the circuit are altered to create the direction-selective responses.

Fitzpatrick is confident that the findings from these experiments can be generalised to other brain regions and will be of value in understanding neurological and psychiatric disorders.

"Many people don't realise that the vast majority of cortical connections are being formed at a time when experience can influence neural activity," he said. "Understanding how experience shapes the architecture of developing neural circuits, and identifying the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms could provide the key to a number of developmental brain disorders." - (EurekAlert!)

Read more:
Short memory test
Mind

October 2008

 
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