Updated 13 June 2013

5 drinking hazards

While drinking may literally make you view the world through rose-tinted glasses, it may also be hazardous to your health. Be aware of the dangers.


While drinking may give your self-confidence levels a real boost and literally make you view the world through rose-tinted glasses, it may also be hazardous to your health. If you choose to drink, you should be aware of the dangers.

Injuring yourself
Drinking too much increases your chances of being injured or even killed. Alcohol is a factor, for example, in about 60% of fatal burn injuries, drownings, and homicides; 50% of severe trauma injuries and sexual assaults; and 40% of fatal motor vehicle crashes, suicides, and fatal falls.

Harmful to your health
Heavy drinkers have a greater risk of liver disease, heart disease, sleep disorders, depression, stroke, bleeding from the stomach, sexually transmitted infections from unsafe sex, and several types of cancer. They may have problems managing diabetes, high blood pressure, and other conditions.

Harmful to your baby
Drinking during pregnancy can cause brain damage and other serious problems in the baby. Because it is not yet known whether any amount of alcohol is safe for a developing baby, women who are pregnant or may become pregnant should not drink.

Alcohol use disorders
Generally known as alcoholism and alcohol abuse, alcohol use disorders are medical conditions that doctors can diagnose when a patient's drinking causes distress or harm.

Personal problems
Beyond these physical and mental health risks, frequent heavy drinking also is linked with personal problems, including losing your driver's license and having relationship troubles.


(Picture: boys night out from Shutterstock)


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