Updated 11 February 2013


Malaise is a non-specific term, meaning a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness. Malaise by itself is not diagnostic of any disorder.



Malaise is a non-specific term, meaning a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness. Malaise by itself is not diagnostic of any disorder.

The early stage of an illness often has malaise as its only symptom: after a few hours, or even a few days, other more specific symptoms appear, which then allow the doctor to make a diagnosis.

Malaise is hardly ever an emergency. In some acute illnesses, the condition can progress very quickly, so that the phase of malaise is short-lived. The specific symptoms then, are those needing the urgent attention, not the malaise which preceded them.


As already stressed, many conditions have malaise in their early phase. Examples of important ones are:

Heart disease

  1. Infectious endocarditis
  2. Myocardial ischaemia
  3. Rhythm disturbances
  4. Heart failure


  1. Virus infections like ‘flu and glandular fever
  2. Bronchitis and pneumonia
  3. Hepatitis
  4. Tuberculosis
  5. Parasitic infestations

Endocrine/metabolic disorders

  1. Diabetes
  2. Thyroid disease
  3. Liver and pancreas disorders, gall-stones
  4. Liver and kidney failure
  5. Severe anaemia
  6. Auto-immune diseases


  1. Lymphomas
  2. Leukaemia
  3. Secondary deposits, for instance in the brain

Side effects of medications

  1. Antihypertensives
  2. Antihistamines
  3. Anticonvulsants
  4. Some psychiatric medications


  1. Depression
  2. Dysthymia


There is no treatment for malaise until the condition causing it has been diagnosed.

Diagnosis begins with clearly identifying any other possible symptoms, and is followed by a thorough examination, looking for any clues which may point to an underlying cause.

Only then can any blood tests or imaging be considered.

If general malaise persists with no clear symptoms emerging, it is reasonable to do a few basic screening tests such as:

  1. Full blood count and electrolytes,
  2. CRP, PCT,
  3. Kidney and liver functions, and
  4. Chest X-ray.

The results of these may point to other tests being necessary, for instance thyroid functions, or auto-antibody tests.

(Dr AG Hall)

More in Medical
Hip pain

Get a quote


Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Up for grabs! »

To vape or not to vape? Twisp's new range of e-cigs Discover your Twisp

Win one of the 3 new devices from Twisp!

Now you can stand a chance of winning one of the 3 new devices, as well as flavours and accessories worth R2000 each!

Love your heart »

SA dying of heart disease Natural trans fats good for heart Heart probs and sex life

How old is your heart? Take this test

What's your heart age? Use the calculator to see the real age of your heart. Post your results in the comments!