Stroke

Updated 05 April 2013

Stroke survivors consider suicide

About one in 12 stroke survivors in the United States thinks about suicide or wishes that they were dead, a new study indicates.

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About one in 12 stroke survivors in the United States thinks about suicide or wishes that they were dead, a new study indicates.

The findings suggest that it might be a good idea to regularly screen stroke survivors for depression and suicidal thoughts, the researchers said.

The investigators analysed data from the 2005 to 2010 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys and found that nearly 8% of stroke survivors reported suicidal thoughts, compared with about 6% of heart attack survivors, 5% of diabetes patients and 4% of cancer patients.

The proportion of stroke survivors who thought about suicide was surprising, compared to patients with other health issues, noted study lead author Dr Amytis Towfighi, an assistant professor of clinical neurology at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and chair of neurology at the Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center.

Regular screening warranted

Stroke survivors who had more severe depression, were younger, had higher body mass index (a measurement of body fat), had less education, and were poorer, single or women were more likely to have suicidal thoughts, according to the study presented Thursday at the American Stroke Association annual meeting, in Honolulu.

17% of the people who'd had a stroke also had depression, which is the most common mental health complication in stroke survivors, the study authors noted.

"Given the high prevalence of suicidal thoughts among stroke survivors, perhaps regular screening for suicidal ideation, in addition to depression, is warranted," Towfighi said in an American Heart Association news release.

Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

There are about 7 million adult stroke survivors in the United States, according to the American Stroke Association.

(HealthDay News, February 2013)

Read More:

Depressed stroke survivors face triple death risk

 

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Dr Naeem Brey completed his MBChB (Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery) degree in 2003 at the University of Cape Town. In 2010 he started he started specialising in Neurology at Tygerberg Hospital and graduated with his specialist exam in FCNeurol (Fellowship of the College of Neurology) in May 2013.

He has a particular interest in stroke as well autoimmune and demyelinating neurological illnesses. Read more about Dr Naeem Brey

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