Stroke

01 March 2011

Thinking about a third arm fools brain

It's apparently possible to make people believe they have three arms, a finding that researchers say could lead to new ways to help people recovering from a stroke.

0

It's apparently possible to make people believe they have three arms, a finding that Swedish researchers say could lead to new ways to help people recovering from a stroke.

For their study, published online in PLoS One, researchers from the Karolinska Institute had participants sit at a table, with a realistic prosthetic arm placed next to their right arm. To make the participants feel that the artificial arm was their own, the researchers touched the person's right hand and the prosthetic hand with small brushes at the same place, at the same time.

"What happens then is that a conflict arises in the brain concerning which of the right hands belongs to the participant's body," researcher Arvid Guterstam said.

The third arm experience

"What one could expect is that only one of the hands is experienced as one's own, presumably the real arm," Guterstam said. "But what we found, surprisingly, is that the brain solves this conflict by accepting both right hands as part of the body image, and the subjects experience having an extra third arm."

The illusion was so effective that when the researchers "threatened" the fake hand with a knife, the participants' stress levels reached the same level as when a knife was held close to their real hand.

They suggested that the results could lead to new ways to use prosthetics to help stroke survivors.

"It may be possible in the future to offer a stroke patient who has become paralysed on one side of the body a prosthetic arm that can be used and experienced as his own, while the paralyzed arm remains within the patient's body image," Henrik Ehrsson, who led the study, said.


(Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

 

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.