Sore throat

advertorial
Updated 24 August 2016

Stop your sore throat quickly

A sore throat is one of the first signs of a cold or flu. Take action with these lozenges, throat sprays and gargles.

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The scratchy pain in the back of the throat is caused by inflammation. Inflammation is the body’s reaction to heal itself and causes pain, temperature, swelling, redness and loss of function in the area which needs healing.

In the throat the inflammation is caused by inhaling foreign particles such as viruses, bacteria or even dust or smoke. These particles lodge in the back of the throat and the body reacts to get rid of them.

Usually the little hair-like structures in the back of the throat move to get rid of the particles by coughing them out. Sometimes, in the process of getting rid of these foreign particles pain, swelling and redness of the throat can occur.

Adcock Ingram makes a range of throat preparations to sooth a sore throat, including Medi-Keel A® Regular, Honey and Lemon or Blackcurrant Throat Lozenges. The lozenges contains benzocaine, a mild local anaesthetic which alleviates the pain of a sore throat and cetylpyridinium chloride which has been shown to kill bacteria and fungi over a prolonged period. The lozenges are oval shaped to fit comfortably in the palate of the mouth while they are being sucked.

Medi-Keel A® Throat Spray contains phenol which has a pain relieving action because it exerts a local anaesthetic effect. It is used for the temporary relief of minor sore throat infections. 

MediKeel A® Throat Gargle contains dibucaine and benzocaine. These have a mild local anaesthetic action which alleviate the pain of a sore throat. It also contains cetylpyridinium chloride which has been shown to rapidly kill bacteria and fungi over a prolonged period.

Read more:
It’s sore throat time of year
How to treat your sore throat

References:
1. Sasaki CT. Introduction to Mouth and Throat Disorders. Merck Manual Consumer Version. Available online at URL: http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/ear,-nose,-and-throat-disorders/mouth-and-throat-disorders/introduction-to-mouthand-throat-disorders. Accessed 25 February 2016
2. The Medical Dictionary available online at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Inflammation accessed 25 February 2016
3. Lechtzin N. Defense Mechanisms of the Respiratory System. MSD Manual Consumer Version. Available online at URL: https://www.msdmanuals.com/home/lung-and-airway-disorders/biology-of-the-lungs-and-airways/defense-mechanisms-ofthe-respiratory-system Accessed 25 February 2016.
4. Medi-Keel A® Throat Lozenges, Medi-Keel A® Honey and Lemon Throat Lozenges and Medi-Keel A® Blackcurrant Throat Lozenges approved package insert, July 1986.
5. Medi-Keel A® Throat Spray approved package insert, June 1988.
6. Medi-Keel A® Throat Gargle approved package insert, February 1976.

S1 Medi-Keel A® Throat Lozenges. Each lozenge contains benzocaine 12 mg; cetylpyridinium chloride 1,5 mg. Reg. No. T/16.3/223. S1 Medi-Keel A® Honey and Lemon Throat Lozenges. Each lozenge contains benzocaine 12 mg; cetylpyridinium chloride 1,5 mg. Reg. No. 33/16.3/0496. S1 Medi-Keel A® Blackcurrant Throat Lozenges. Each lozenge contains benzocaine 12 mg; cetylpyridinium chloride 1,5 mg. Reg. No. 33/16.3/0495. S1 Medi-Keel A® Throat Gargle. Each 15 ml solution contains dibucaine hydrochloride 5 mg; benzocaine 30 mg; cetylpyridinium chloride 3,713 mg; benzyl alcohol 60 mg. Reg. No. H/16.3/199. S0 Medi-Keel A® Throat Spray. Each 100 ml contains phenol 0,5 g. Reg. No. T/16.4/184. For full prescribing information refer to the package insert approved by the medicines regulatory authority. 10261436 03/2016 Adcock Ingram Limited. Reg. No. 1949/034385/06. Private Bag X69, Bryanston, 2021, South Africa. Tel. +27 11 635 0000 www.adcock.com