Sleep Disorders

07 March 2007

Housewives worst sleepers

Stay-at-home moms are most likely to sleep poorly, according to a new US survey that found 60 percent of women only get a good night's sleep a few times a week.

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Stay-at-home moms are most likely to sleep poorly, according to a new US survey that found 60 percent of women only get a good night's sleep a few times a week and that 67 percent frequently experience a sleep problem.

The 2007 Sleep in America poll of 1 003 women, ages 18 to 64, which was released Tuesday by the US National Sleep Foundation, also found that 43 percent of the respondents said daytime sleepiness interferes with their daily activities.

Working mothers (72 percent) and single working women (68 percent) were more likely to report such symptoms of sleep problems as insomnia, but stay-at-home moms reported the highest level of overall sleep problems.

The poll found that 74 percent of stay-at-home mothers reported symptoms of insomnia at least a few nights a week, 59 percent said they frequently woke up feeling un-refreshed and 9 percent said they slept with a child or infant, which adds to the sleep disturbances experienced by the mothers.

Doesn’t slow them down
While many women struggle with lack of sleep, it doesn't slow them down. The survey found that 80 percent of women said that when they experience daytime sleepiness, they just accept it and keep going. In order to push through their day, 65 percent are likely to use caffeinated beverages, with 37 percent consuming three or more caffeinated beverages per day.

Even though they may be tired, many women aren't going to bed earlier. Instead, they're watching television, finishing household chores, doing family activities, going online, or doing job-related work. – (HealthDayNews)

Read more:
Sleep Centre
Woman Zone

March 2007

 

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Sleep disorders expert

Dr Alison Bentley is a general practitioner who has consulted in sleep medicine and sleep disorders, in both adults and children of all ages, for almost 30 years. She also researches and publishes on a number of sleep-related topics both in formal research journals and lay publications including as editor of Sleep Matters, an educational newsletter on sleep disorders for doctors.

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