Sleep Disorders

11 August 2014

Exercise, sleep lower cancer risk

Regular physical activity can significantly lower a woman's risk of developing cancer, but skimping on sleep can eliminate those gains, a study found.

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Regular physical activity can significantly lower a woman's risk of developing cancer, but skimping on sleep can eliminate those gains, a study found.

In a long-term study of nearly 6 000 US women, researchers found that those who exercised the most had a 25% lower chance of developing cancer than those who were the least active. But among younger, physically active women, those who slept less than seven hours a night had a 47% higher risk of being diagnosed with cancer than those who regularly got a good night's rest.

"Greater participation in physical activity has consistently been associated with reduced risk of cancer incidence at several sites, including breast and colon cancers," said James McClain, a cancer prevention fellow at the National Cancer Institute and lead author of the study.

Insufficient sleep linked to many problems
"Short duration sleep appears to have opposing effects of physical activity on several key hormonal and metabolic parameters, which is why we looked at how it affected the exercise/cancer risk relationship."

It is not yet known exactly why exercise reduces cancer risks but researchers believe it could be due to the lower body weight, improved immune function and hormone levels associated with regular physical activity.

Insufficient sleep has been linked to high risks of developing a number of conditions including heart disease, obesity and diabetes but, again, researchers have not determined exactly how sleep prevents disease.

The study was presented at a conference in Washington sponsored by the American Association for Cancer Research. – (Sapa, December 2008)

 

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Dr Alison Bentley is a general practitioner who has consulted in sleep medicine and sleep disorders, in both adults and children of all ages, for almost 30 years. She also researches and publishes on a number of sleep-related topics both in formal research journals and lay publications including as editor of Sleep Matters, an educational newsletter on sleep disorders for doctors.

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