Prostate cancer

Updated 29 May 2015

The Peeball

Ever wanted to make your visit to the bathroom a bit more interesting? Take a Peeball with you, and dissolve away at least 5 seconds of boredom.

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Ever wanted to make your visit to the bathroom a bit more interesting? Take a Peeball with you, and dissolve away at least 5 seconds of boredom.

But the Peeball is not just for amusement – it's an odd yet fascinating little invention that is useful in determining if you have prostate cancer or not.

How it works

The ball itself is made of a biodegradable powder that easily dissolves when coming into contact with any form of liquid.

The prostate is an apricot-sized organ situated behind the bladder. The urethra, the pipe through which urine is passed, is connected to the bladder that runs through the prostate. When cancer is present in the prostate, it becomes enlarged. When enlarged the prostate puts pressure on the urethra, thus weakening the urine flow.

The test to see if you have an enlarged prostate is simple; all you need is a urinal, a Peeball and a full bladder. Also, a urinal is required, because the water in a normal toilet-bowl would simply dissolve the ball. All you have to do is place the Peeball in the urinal, take aim and fire or, in this case, “shower” away. If you manage to completely dissolve that sucker, or at least most of it, then you're safe. If not, it would be best for you to consult your doctor.

Symptoms of prostate cancer

  • Difficulty when passing urine
  • Pain while passing urine
  • Constant feeling that the bladder is full
  • Waiting long periods of time for the urine to start to flow
  • Feeling that the bladder isn’t properly emptied

The Peeball was originally designed to create public awareness regarding prostate cancer and other men’s health issues. By turning it into a game, the Peeball spread like wild-fire in the UK and prostate cancer awareness has blossomed.

The Peeball has also become a popular choice for birthday and Christmas gifts.

Who would have guessed that a quirky toilet-bowl object could save your life, or the life of a loved one? (Health 24, Kyle Boshoff, August 2010)

 

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