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02 December 2008

Can kidney failure be cured?

Acute renal failure is a serious condition but it may resolve in time and sometimes within days. Recovery also depends on the underlying cause and the treatment given.

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Acute renal failure is a serious condition but it may resolve in time and sometimes within days. Recovery also depends on the underlying cause and the treatment given. Children tend to have a better chance of regaining their kidney function than adults. Only a minority of patients with ARF is left with permanent residual kidney damage.

In chronic renal failure the kidney function decreases gradually but progressively over time. It is a lifelong condition that can lead to end-stage renal disease in some patients. However this process can be delayed in many patients by measures aimed at preserving as much kidney function as possible. This includes controlling blood pressure and other conditions that can affect the progression of CRF.

Taking your medication, following the correct diet, and fluid intake is important. Patients with CRF must avoid drugs that are harmful to the kidneys and have urinary tract infections treated promptly.

Read more:
Recognising kidney trouble
Glass of milk a day keep kidney stones away

National Kidney Foundation

Continence Association of South Africa (CASA)

 
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