Hypertension

20 September 2012

Yoghurt lowers risk of high blood pressure

Adding more yoghurt to your diet without increasing the number of kilojoules you eat may help lower your risk of high blood pressure, according to new research presented.

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Adding more yoghurt to your diet without increasing the number of kilojoules you eat may help lower your risk of high blood pressure, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association's High Blood Pressure Research 2012 Scientific Sessions.

A recent study found long-term yoghurt-eaters were less likely to develop high blood pressure and on average had lower systolic blood pressure than those who didn't eat yoghurt. Systolic blood pressure is the top number in a blood pressure reading. It measures the force of blood against the walls of your arteries when your heart is beating.

During the 15 year study, researchers followed more than 2 000 volunteers who did not have high blood pressure at the start of the study. Yoghurt consumption was measured by questionnaires filled out by the volunteers at three intervals over the study period.

 Study participants were 31% less likely to develop high blood pressure if at least 2% of their daily kilojoules came from yohgurt, which would be like eating at least one six-ounce cup of low-fat yoghurt every three days. In addition, their systolic blood pressure increased less than that of people who didn't eat yoghurt.

(EurekAlert, September 2012)

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Dr Jacomien de Villiers qualified as a specialist physician at the University of Pretoria in 1995. She worked at various clinics at the Department of Internal Medicine, Steve Biko Hospital, these include General Internal Medicine, Hypertension, Diabetes and Cardiology. She has run a private practice since 2001, as well as a consultant post at the Endocrine Clinic of Steve Biko Hospital.

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