Hearing management

Updated 04 August 2016

Hearing test may be early predictor of autism

A study has identified a simple, safe and noninvasive method to screen young children for hearing deficits that are associated with autism.

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A simple hearing test may help identify young children at risk for autism before they're old enough to speak, a new study suggests.

A new window into the disorder

Researchers from the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York, say they've identified an inner-ear problem in children with autism that may impair their ability to recognise speech.

"This study identifies a simple, safe and noninvasive method to screen young children for hearing deficits that are associated with autism," said study co-author Anne Luebke, an associate professor in the departments of biomedical engineering and neuroscience.

"This technique may provide clinicians a new window into the disorder and enable us to intervene earlier and help achieve optimal outcomes," she said in a university news release.

Read: Loud noise may increase your heart disease risk

Autism spectrum disorder is characterised by impaired social-communication skills and restricted and repetitive behaviours. While many signs of autism appear before age 2, most children aren't diagnosed until after age 4, the researchers said. They suggested that if treatments could start sooner they might have more impact.

For the study, Luebke and her colleagues tested the hearing of children between ages 6 and 17 with and without autism. Those with autism had hearing difficulty in a specific frequency (1-2 kilohertz, or kHz) that is important for processing speech.

Developmental delay

The degree of hearing impairment was associated with the severity of autism symptoms, according to the study.

Hearing "impairment has long been associated with developmental delay and other problems, such as language deficits," said study co-author Loisa Bennetto, an associate professor of clinical and social sciences in psychology.

Read: What can be done to help kids hear?

"While there is no association between hearing problems and autism, difficulty in processing speech may contribute to some of the core symptoms of the disease," Bennetto said.

If future research confirms the findings, the study authors say the screening could help identify children at risk for autism earlier and perhaps get them services sooner.

"Additionally, these findings can inform the development of approaches to correct auditory impairment with hearing aids or other devices that can improve the range of sounds the ear can process," Bennetto said.

The hearing test is noninvasive, inexpensive and does not require a child to respond verbally, so it could be adapted to screen infants, the researchers said.

The study was published in the journal Autism Research.

Read more:

What is hearing loss?

Symptoms of hearing loss

Types of hearing loss

 

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Hearing Expert

AuD degree obtained in 2013 at AT Still University Health Science Depart-ment, Arizona. Masters in Communication Pathology at the University of Pretoria, 2003. Remedial Teaching Diploma at Rand University, 1996. Degree in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology at the University of Pretoria, 1993. Owner of a private practice in Pretoria since 1999. Educating the community regarding early identification of hearing problems and screening of new-borns. Providing assistance and services at retirement homes. Part-time lecturer at the University of Pretoria and the University of Limpopo. External examiner at the University of Pretoria and the University of Limpopo. Presenter at conferences and seminars.

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