HIV/Aids

05 March 2014

Monthly HIV protective shots may replace pills

A regular shot may someday offer an alternative to the daily pills that some people currently take to cut their risk of getting HIV from sex with an infected partner.

0
A shot every one to three months may someday give an alternative to the daily pills that some people take now to cut their risk of getting HIV from sex with an infected partner.

Scientists say a long-acting, experimental drug completely protected monkeys from infection in two studies reported at an Aids conference in Boston.

Read: Transmission of HIV

If testing in people shows the same, the shots could become a new tool to curb the spread of HIV. There's already a daily pill that can be taken by those who don't have the virus but are at risk of getting it from an infected partner.

Watch:

Methods to help control HIV/Aids

New HIV vaccine discussion

The studies were done by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and researchers at Rockefeller University in New York.

Read more:

Health minister optimistic about HIV vaccine

Better HIV antibodies may lead to new vaccine

HIV intervention aimed at SA men a success

 

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Ask the Expert

HIV/Aids expert

Dr Sindisiwe van Zyl qualified at the University of Pretoria in 2005. She is a patients' rights activist and loves using social media to teach about HIV. She is in private practice in Johannesburg.

Still have a question?

Get free advice from our panel of experts

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

* You must accept our condition

Forum Rules