HIV/AIDS

23 January 2014

HIV intervention aimed at SA men a success

A large-scale human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intervention/education effort aimed at South African men has proven successful.

A large-scale human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intervention/education effort aimed at helping South African men take a proactive role in the prevention of that disease has proven successful, an important development considering that country has the largest number of HIV infections in the world.

Researchers, led by Prof John B. Jemmott, III, Annenberg School for Communication and the Perelman School of Medicine; and Loretta Sweet Jemmott from Penn Nursing Science* developed an intervention involving nearly 1 200 individuals, who participated in customized and proactive education programmes on condom usage and the importance of discussing safe sex in their relationships. The results of their study are being reported this week in the American Journal of Public Health (Volume 104, Issue 2).

Nearly 1 200 individuals in 44 neighbourhoods near East London in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa participated in the programme and follow-up surveys conducted over a 12-month period. Approximately half participated in an HIV/STI (sexually transmitted infection) risk reduction intervention, and half in a general health information (control) intervention.

Intervention programmes

Participants were recruited via community meetings and public gathering places such as marketplaces, taxi stands, and shebeens (after-hours drinking clubs). The intervention programs, called “Men, Together Making a Difference", were conducted in isiXhosa.

The intervention sessions involved rituals such as beginning with a “Circle of Men", which enabled all participants, regardless of age or economic status, to develop stronger bonds. Additional components of the HIV/STI prevention included a video magazine, “The Subject Is: HIV”, addressing the impact of the disease in South Africa; a video drama “Eiyish!”, addressing dangers of multiple partners and the failure to use condoms; take-home assignments; and in-class role-playing to increase the discussion and ultimately the use of condoms.

Read: Multiple partner shock

Follow-up surveys

Follow-up surveys after one year showed an increase in condom use by participants, regardless of whether they were involved with steady or casual partners for intercourse. (From 54% to 63% for men involved with steady partners and from 77% to 79% for men involved with casual partners.) Also, follow-up surveys showed slight decreases in the occurrences of unprotected sex

Participants also reported a 4 to 5% increase in the number of times men talked to their partners about condom use prior to sex.

“The fact that HIV affects women most severely in regions such as the sub-Saharan Africa where heterosexual exposure is a dominant mode of HIV transmission is well established,” the authors write in the article.

 “Yet few interventions to change the heterosexual behaviour of men have been developed and rigorously evaluated.” They note that not only was this the first large-scale study of its kind, but that South African men demonstrated a willingness to attend multiple intervention sessions, participate in role-play condom use scenarios, and return for repeated efficacy assessments. 

They stressed the need for additional research to strengthen the impact of intervention programs.

Read more:

•             SA’s HIV treatment plan in disarray

•             Clinics running short of HIV/Aids drugs

 

EurekAlert

 

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Dr Sindisiwe van Zyl qualified at the University of Pretoria before working for an HIV/AIDS NPO in Soweto for many years. She was named one of the Mail & Guardian's Top 200 Young South Africans in 2012.

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