Updated 27 January 2015

Gates sees 'miracle' tools for Aids by 2030

A vaccine is seen as pivotal in preventing new Aids infections, while new kinds of intense drug treatments should do away with the need for life-long pills, says Bill Gates.


Two new tools to fight Aids should be available by 2030 in the form of a vaccine and new intense drug treatments, ending most cases of a disease that has killed millions in the past 30 years, according to Bill Gates.

The Microsoft founder, whose philanthropic foundation has poured millions of dollars into medical research, told the World Economic Forum in Davos the "two miracles" were within reach in the coming years.

"We're pretty optimistic in this 15-year period we will get those two new tools," Gates told a session late on Friday.

A vaccine is seen as pivotal in preventing new infections among susceptible populations, while new kinds of intense drug treatments should do away with the need for life-long pills, he said.

Read: China diagnosed 104 000 new HIV/Aids cases

Gates, whose Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation plays a major role in funding medical research, is also optimistic about the fight against malaria, where work on a vaccine is more advanced than for Aids.

GlaxoSmithKline filed the world's first malaria vaccine for approval in July last year.

"We won't see the end of Aids," Gates told the forum. "But both for malaria and Aids we're seeing that the tools that will let us do 95 to 100 percent reduction, those tools will be invented during this 15-year period."

Bill and Melinda Gates predicted in their annual letter on the work of their foundation this week that the lives of people in poor countries would improve faster in the next 15 years than at any other time in history.

Also read:

Birth control shot may boost HIV risk
New test can identify both HIV and hepatitis
Food-safety principles for people with HIV


Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Ask the Expert

HIV/Aids expert

Dr Sindisiwe van Zyl qualified at the University of Pretoria before working for an HIV/AIDS NPO in Soweto for many years. She was named one of the Mail & Guardian's Top 200 Young South Africans in 2012.

Still have a question?

Get free advice from our panel of experts

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

* You must accept our condition

Forum Rules